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Q&A with Prof Serena Best CBE

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 19, 2017.

September's issue of IOM3 Materials world magazine features a Q & A session with Professor Serena Best CBE FREng FIMMM.

http://www.iom3.org/materials-world-magazine/feature/2017/...

Inaugural meeting of ENCHPOPGOS network

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 19, 2017.

The inaugural meeting of the ENCHPOPGOS network will take place on 25th to 27th September at Robinson College, Cambridge. ENCHPOPGOS, the European Network for the Comparative History of Population Geography and Occupational Structure, brings together scholars from all over Europe who are or plan to work on similar projects and are committed to working in a commensurable and common framework over the period 1500-1914 to create datasets not merely of national occupational structures but scalable datasets at the local and regional levels. The network is co-ordinated by Dr Leigh Shaw-Taylor, Director of CAMPOP, and Dr Alexis Litvine.

Climate change and Syrian War revisited

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 19, 2017.

A new study, just published in the journal Political Geography, shows that there is no sound evidence that global climate change was a factor in causing the Syrian civil war. Claims that a major drought caused by anthropogenic climate change was a key factor in starting the Syrian civil war have gained considerable traction since 2015 and have become an accepted narrative in the press, most recently repeated by former US vice president Al Gore in relation to Brexit. This study, led by Professor Jan Selby at the University of Sussex, and co-authored by new Cambridge Geography professor Mike Hulme, takes a fresh look at the existing evidence for these claims as well as conducting new research into Syrian rainfall data and the experiences of Syrian refugees.

SIP programme participant biographies

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Sep 18, 2017.

Monday 18th September 2017 - 10:00

 

Below you will find extended biographies for many of the participants in the Mathematics of Sea Ice Phenomena programme (August - December 2017).

 

Dr Luke Bennetts

Cambridge-AstraZeneca PhD Programme in Chemical Synthesis

By dh473 from News. Published on Sep 14, 2017.

Courtesy University of Cambridge

Applications are invited for a four-year PhD programme based in the Department of Chemistry in connection with the new AstraZeneca Global Research and Development Centre at Cambridge.

Geography, materialism, and the neo-vitalist turn

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 13, 2017.

Professor of Cultural and Historical Geography Matthew Gandy and Research Associate Sandra Jasper have published a new paper in Dialogues in Human Geography entitled 'Geography, materialism, and the neo-vitalist turn'. The paper addresses a growing body of geographical literature that adopts a neo-vitalist approach to the understanding of nature and the human subject and the wider political and ethical tensions that such an approach can bring about.

'Keep it local' approach to protecting the rainforest can be more effective than government schemes

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 12, 2017.

Conservation initiatives led by local and indigenous groups can be just as effective as schemes led by government, according to new research by a team led by Cambridge Geography Research Associate Judith Schleicher. In some cases in the Amazon rainforest, grassroots initiatives can be even more effective at protecting this vital ecosystem. This is particularly important due to widespread political resistance to hand over control over forests and other natural resources to local communities.

Into the Inferno nominated for an Emmy

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 11, 2017.

Congratulations to Professor of Volcanology Clive Oppenheimer whose documentary Into the Inferno (directed by Werner Herzog) has been nominated for 'Outstanding Science and Technology Documentary' in the 2017 News and Documentary Emmy Awards. The awards will be presented on 5 October 2017.

New grant: Energy innovation for low-cost housing in India and South Africa

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 08, 2017.

University Senior Lecturer Dr Charlotte Lemanski has received a grant from the British Academy Global Challenges Research Fund: Cities and Infrastructure for a project entitled "Energy innovation for low-cost housing in India and South Africa: strategies for inter-disciplinary and cross-institutional dialogue". Many congratulations! We are also currently recruiting a research associate to work with Charlotte on the project.

Rolls Royce and the RR UTC shortlisted for an award at this year's THE Awards

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 07, 2017.

Rolls Royce has been shortlisted for its work with the universities of Cambridge, Birmingham and Swansea in the Most Innovative Contribution to Business-University Collaboration category at this year’s Times Higher Education Awards.  The Rolls Royce UTC has been part of the...

Postgraduate Open Day event - save the date - 3rd Nov

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 05, 2017.

The Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy will be participating in the University's Postgraduate Open Day on Friday 3 November. During the afternoon session at the Department there will be opportunities to discuss PhD projects, the MASt in Materials Science, and MPhil in Micro- and...

5 Things I Wish I’d Known As A First Year Geography Student…

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 05, 2017.

Compass, the magazine and online blog run by our student society CUGS (Cambridge University Geographical Society), gives 5 tips for new students starting in October. Our favourite: 5) have fun!

Women in Antarctica: the trouble with heroism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 04, 2017.

PhD student Morgan Seag writes for Chemistry World on the history of women in Antarctica, and the 'trouble with heroism' as a myth surrounding antarctic study which excluded women until the 1960s and 70s.

Women in Antarctica: the trouble with heroism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 04, 2017.

PhD student Morgan Seag writes for Chemistry World on the history of women in Antarctica, and the 'trouble with heroism' as a myth surrounding antarctic study which excluded women until the 1960s and 70s.

New connections in climate histories

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 01, 2017.

In a new article for Pages Magazine, Professor of Environmental Systems and Processes Ulf Buentgen reports back from a groundbreaking meeting of climate history scholars that took place in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, from the 10-14 April 2017. The meeting brought together 45 specialists from 7 countries in archaeology, biogeochemistry, climatology, ecology, history, and epidemiology.

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 31, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

Performance of the year nomination for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 30, 2017.

The Norwegian Critics Association has announced that Trial of the Century has been nominated for its 2017 annual Critics Prize. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. PhD student Ragnhild Dale served as assistant director and researcher for the production, which was closely linked to her doctoral research. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers. Congratulations to all on this prestigious nomination!

Decolonising Geographical Knowledges: RGS-IBG Conference 2017

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 30, 2017.

Professor of Latin American Geography Sarah Radcliffe is Chair of this year's RGS-IBG Conference, on the theme of Decolonising Geographical Knowledges, running from Tuesday 29 August- Friday 1 September. The conference will welcome around 1,600-plus participants who will contribute to around 380 themed sessions. The programme also includes sessions for post-graduate students and early career researchers. Professor Radcliffe provides reflections on the theme in her welcome to delegates.

Performance of the year nomination for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 30, 2017.

The Norwegian Critics Association has announced that Trial of the Century has been nominated for its 2017 annual Critics Prize. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. PhD student Ragnhild Dale served as assistant director and researcher for the production, which was closely linked to her doctoral research. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers. Congratulations to all on this prestigious nomination!

Mud, mud and more mud: salt marsh sampling in Essex

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 29, 2017.

PhD Student Helen Brooks writes about her work with salt marshes and tidal flats in Geoblogy - the blog of the British Geological Survey. Helen is looking at their sediment properties and stability and how they may protect us from coastal flooding as sea levels rise.

Clare Grey receives clutch of awards

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 24, 2017.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry Photography

Professor Clare Grey has received several awards in recognition of her research achievements. 

Steve Ley receives 2018 Arthur C. Cope Award

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 24, 2017.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry Photography

Living in state housing in Africa: expectations, contradictions and consequences

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 24, 2017.

Dr Charlotte Lemanski has co-edited a special edition of Transformation which explores state housing in Africa as a space of living. Increasing numbers of African citizens are living in state-supported housing, particularly in urban areas, but the everyday realities of living in (as opposed to legislating or delivering) state housing have been understudied. The six articles in this special edition cover a range of locations, from Luanda, to Nairobi, Maputo, Johannesburg, and Durban, and use a mixture of methods to explore different 'lived experiences'.

Cambridge Geography talks snow leopards in Kyrgyzstan

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 23, 2017.

PhD student Jonny Hanson is attending the International Snow Leopard & Ecosystem Summit, in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, 23rd - 25th August 2017. The Summit brings together representatives from governments of the twelve snow leopard range countries, as well as of other interested nations, with international institutions, donor agencies, conservation organizations, and scientific institutions. Jonny is participating on the basis of his soon-to-be-completed PhD in Geography entitled, 'Snow leopards and sustainability: livelihoods, governance and coexistence in the Nepal Himalayas'.

Ordnance Survey boss on the importance of Geography

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 21, 2017.

Cambridge Alumnus and Chief Executive of the Ordnance Survey Nigel Clifford writes in this Saturday's Times on his career and the importance of Geography as a discipline. (Please note link contains paywall). He says: 'It (Geography) taught me that the world is a system and that you have to think in systems terms when you are dealing with a problem or with an opportunity. When you are working in a world of ecosystems, it gives you that integrated view, a world where everything is connected. Geography is more relevant than it has ever been'

Honorable Mention for Natura Urbana

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 18, 2017.

The new documentary 'Natura Urbana The Brachen of Berlin' by Professor Matthew Gandy, created as part of his Rethinking Urban Nature project, has been awarded one of three 'honourable mentions' at the Karlsruhe Science Film Days. The win comes shortly after the film's victory in the 'Best German BioDiversity Film' category of NaturaVision Film Festival last month. Congratulations to Matthew and all the team! Watch the film trailer.

How the search for mythical monsters can help conservation in the real world

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 16, 2017.

Writing in The Conversation, Professor Bill Adams and Visiting Researcher Shane McCorristine explore the benefits that the search for mythical creatures such as the Yeti, Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster might have for conservation. Cryptozoology, as it is known, has a long shared history with conservation and exploration. Furthermore, the article argues, cryptozoologists help to map the world's still undiscovered species and bring a sense of wonder to our ecological imagination that should not be discounted.

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

Tenth round of Returning Carers Scheme now open

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

Department of Chemistry courtesy Nathan Pitt

The Returning Carers Scheme assists returning carers to build up their research profiles or other academic activity following a break in their career or a period of leave for caring responsibilities.

Struggling with home ownership and wellbeing

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

A new paper by Honorary Professor Susan Smith and team explores how individuals' wellbeing is affected by transitioning in and out of home ownership. Although it has long been assumed that home ownership is a basic foundation of wellbeing, this study of individuals in the UK and Australia found that those struggling on the edges of home ownership might in fact experience an increase in their wellbeing once they had left home ownership and moved into renting.

Amateur Musical Societies and Sports Clubs in Provincial France

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 11, 2017.

A new book by retired University Lecturer Dr Alan Baker explores how leisure groups in 19th century France served as expressions of the Revolutionary French concept of fraternité​. Amateur Musical Societies and Sports Clubs in Provincial France, 1848-1914 uses a mass of unpublished and hitherto unused sources in provincial and national archives, to analyse the history, geography and cultural significance of amateur musical societies and sports clubs in eleven départements of France between 1848 and 1914.

Mycotourism: bringing social, political and ecological stability to Northern Spain?

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 10, 2017.

A new paper by Professor Ulf Buentgen and team explores a new model of 'mycotourism' emerging in central North-eastern Spain through mushroom industries. The paper describes how this novel branch of eco-tourism can help stabilize social and political structures and compensate for losses related to widespread unemployment and summer drought, as well as generate unexpectedly fruitful research opportunities.

Measures of poverty and well-being still ignore the environment – this must change

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 09, 2017.

Writing for The Conversation Department Reader Bhaskar Vira and Postdoctoral Research Associate Judith Schleicher explore the need to write the environment into our understandings of wealth and wellbeing. They argue that without nature, humans could be neither healthy nor happy, and yet the natural world can be completely ransacked without causing even a tiny blip on our usual measures of economic progress or poverty. Recognising that this needs to change is a crucial step towards building a more inclusive, equitable and sustainable society.

New paper: urban atmospheres

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 08, 2017.

Professor of Cultural and Historical Geography Matthew Gandy's AAG annual lecture entitled "Urban atmospheres" is now published in the journal Cultural Geographies. The paper explores the questions: What is an urban atmosphere? How can we differentiate an 'atmosphere' from other facets of urban consciousness and experience? It uses wider cultural, political, and philosophical connotations of atmospheres as a focal point for critical reflections on space and subjectivity.

Interdisciplinary tree-ring research in the Republic of Tuva

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 07, 2017.

Together with a team of Russian archaeologists and ecologists from Karsnoyarsk, Ulf Büntgen (Professor of Environmental Systems Analysis) has been conducting fieldwork in the remote Republic of Tuva at the border between southern Siberia and northern Mongolia. During their two-week expedition, the interdisciplinary team was mainly searching for living trees and subfossil wood which can be used to improve and prolong existing climate reconstructions. The Republic of Tuva was chosen as it represents an important part of the homeland of nomadic step empires, such as the Scythians, Huns, Turks and Mongols, and the role climate played in the tumultuous history of these empires is still unknown.

Policy windows for the environment: Tips for improving the uptake of scientific knowledge

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 03, 2017.

A new study by former Cambridge researcher David Christian Rose with Senior Research Associate Robert Doubleday and the Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy explores the impact of 'policy windows' on the impact of scientific research. The team have put together a series of four stages for scientists to best engage with the occurrence of policy windows to encourage evidence-led policy.

BP Lecturer announced

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 01, 2017.

The year's BP Chemistry Lecturer speaker will be Professor Yuhan Sun.

New interdisciplinary lectureships

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 01, 2017.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry has appointed three interdisciplinary lecturers, who will start their new positions in October.  

Blavatnik Postdoc Fellowships

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 01, 2017.

Image courtesy of British Council

The Blavatnik Postdoctoral Fellowship Programme is inviting applications from Israelis seeking to undertake their first postdoctoral funding in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering at the University of Cambridge.

Chemistry Networks Event Registration Open

By dh473 from News. Published on Aug 01, 2017.

Image courtesy Department of Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry is delighted to invite you to get to know us better at the annual Chemistry Networks Event on Friday 29 September.

Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jul 25, 2017.

The Council on Superconductivity has selected Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions to Applied Superconductivity Materials Technology. This IEEE Award recognizes a living individual for a career of meritorious achievements...

Gallery: INI 25th anniversary celebrations

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jul 24, 2017.

Monday 24th July 2017 - 16:45

 

On 20 July 2017 the Institute held a day of celebrations to mark the 25th anniversary of its opening in 1992. Amongst the many esteemed guests and speakers present were founding INI director Sir Michael Atiyah OM FRS FRSE FMedSci FREng, Fields Medallist Martin Hairer KBE FRS, broadcasters Dr Hannah Fry and Dr Simon Singh (pictured above), and - to mark what was also the anniversary of his original proof of Fermat's Last Theorem - Sir Andrew Wiles. The talks took place in the very same room in which Sir Andrew first presented his proof of the 17th century conjecture. 

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

Archive and Picture Library achieve Accredited status

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

We are delighted to announce that the Institute's Archive and Picture Library have been recognised under the national accreditation scheme.

Watch INI's 25th anniversary lectures live - 20 July 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jul 19, 2017.

Thursday 20th July 2017 - 10:00

 

Although our 25th anniversary celebrations - which take place on Thursday 20 July 2017 - are an invite-only event, we will be streaming many of the day's talks live.

Click here to view this live coverage, which will comprise many of the items in the below schedule.

 

25th anniversary puzzle winner(s) announced!

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jul 17, 2017.

Monday 17th July 2017 - 10:30

 

Many thanks to all of you who entered our exciting 25th anniversary puzzle competition! We have now sifted through all of the excellent responses and randomly chosen a winning set of answers.

Antarctic ice-shelf break-up

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 14, 2017.

A paper published this week in the Annals of Glaciology, by an international team including Alison Banwell and Ian Willis, identifies the causes of crack formation and propagation on the McMurdo Ice shelf, Antarctica, where they have recently been undertaking fieldwork. Eventually this rift will result in the calving of an iceberg from the ice shelf, through a similar process to that which enabled the large iceberg to break-off the Larsen C Ice Shelf, a few days ago. As the climate warms it is possible that such ice shelf calving events will become larger and more frequent.

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 13, 2017.

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 10, 2017.

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.

Don’s Diary

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 05, 2017.

This article first appeared in CAM - the Cambridge Alumni Magazine – Issue 81 Easter 2017. Professor Marian Holness is Professor of Petrology and a Fellow of Trinity College.

Congratulations to Dr Xavier Moya

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 30, 2017.

Dr Xavier Moya has been awarded the Emerging Talent Award 2017, which is awarded by the Spanish Society of Researcher in the United Kingdom (SRUK) and the Santander Bank Foundation.

‘Plumerang’ health risk

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 21, 2017.

Scientists have discovered that significant changes can occur in the composition of volcanic eruptive plumes whilst circulating high above the atmosphere. Nicknamed ‘plumerangs’, the evolution of such plumes represent a previously unappreciated health hazard.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 20, 2017.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron on being awarded the UK Society for Biomaterials President's Prize 2017. Ruth will be giving her prize winner's lecture at the UKSB annual conference at Loughborough University this week. The lecture is expected to be titled "Ice Templated Structures for...

Prof Serena Best receives a CBE

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 19, 2017.

Congratulations to Professor Serena Best on being awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours, for services to biomaterials engineering.

Solve our 25th anniversary puzzle and win tickets to the celebratory event

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jun 15, 2017.

Thursday 15th June 2017 - 15:45

Can you solve our 25th anniversary puzzle?
 

This year, the Isaac Newton Institute marks its 25th anniversary. To celebrate, we will be hosting a grand day of talks and celebrations. Taking place on Thursday 20 July 2017, the prestigious list of attendees includes many notable mathematicians and affiliates of the Institute. But perhaps most exciting of all is the following: a conversation between Sir Andrew Wiles and his biographer Simon Singh on how Andrew found the proof for one of the hardest problems in mathematics.

Congratulations to Dr Elliott and Dr Stone

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 15, 2017.

We are delighted that two of our academics have received promotions, to commence 1st October 2017. Dr James Elliott will become a Professor and Dr Howard Stone will become a Reader.  We hope you will join us in congratulating them.

Congratulations to Dr Rowan Leary

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 13, 2017.

Dr Rowan Leary has been awarded a Royal Society Tata University Research Fellowship, to commence January 2018.  Dr Leary works in the field of high-resolution and 3D electron microcopy.  More about his work can be found in his profile.

Fields Medalist Sir Vaughan Jones to give special talk at INI

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jun 13, 2017.

Tuesday 13th June 2017 - 12:30

Sir Vaughan Jones will be delivering a special talk on "Knots and links from the Thompson groups" at INI on Wednesday 14 June.

Noted for his extensive work on von Neumann algebras and recipient of the Fields Medal in 1990, Vaughan Jones is an organiser of the current six month INI programme "Operator algebras: subfactors and their applications". This hour-long talk has been arranged at short notice due to recent and significant developments in his research. 

The talk is open to all and the full details are as follows:

Work for INI: IT Technician required

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jun 13, 2017.

Wednesday 31st May 2017 - 09:00

Following a recent review and restructure of the IT team, this new position has been created to help support the IT requirements of INI's administrative team and visiting academics. The post, whilst funded by the Isaac Newton Institute, is managed by the Centre for Mathematical Sciences (CMS) IT Department, and will work across both sites, predominantly providing support to INI's Senior Web & AV Technician to record workshop seminars (approximately 20 weeks per year), and also to provide front-line IT support to students, academics and staff. 

America's eroding edges: stories from the field

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 12, 2017.

PhD student Victoria Herrmann is documenting her fieldwork exploring the effects of climate change on communities across America in a series of blog posts and articles. Victoria is currently travelling across the US and its territories, interviewing communities directly affected by shoreline erosion and climate change, and recording the impact on their ways of life.

Engaging with Science Policy

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 09, 2017.

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.

Prince Albert II of Monaco becomes Patron of SPRI

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 07, 2017.

We are pleased to announce that HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco has agreed to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute. Prince Albert, who has visited both poles and whose great- great-grandfather, Albert I, was a prominent Arctic explorer, has strong ongoing interests in the Arctic and Antarctic. Prince Albert said of his new role, "I am delighted to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute and to support their important research and heritage activities relating to the Arctic and Antarctic, especially in the context of the continuing environmental changes affecting these sensitive parts of the global climate system". Prince Albert has visited the SPRI on several previous occasions and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation has also supported the research work of the Institute.

Dr Rachel Evans receives the Dillwyn medal

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 23, 2017.

Congratulations to our new lecturer Rachel Evans who has been awarded the Dillwyn medal for STEMM by the Learned Society of Wales. This award recognises her work on new photoactive materials - used to improve the efficiency of solar cells, in smart sensing platforms for bio-diagnostics and to...

SPRI Library catalogue search now online

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 12, 2017.

We are proud to announce that the Library catalogue of the Scott Polar Research Institute is now available to be searched online. This has been the culmination of many years of data improvements and technical conversion work. The collection will also be added to the main University Library catalogue in 2018.

New Cambridge research tracks changes to supraglacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 11, 2017.

A new paper by a team at the Scott Polar Research Institute presents a novel method for tracking changes to individual supraglacial lakes in West Greenland using MODIS satellite imagery. The method developed is a Fully Automated Supraglacial lake Tracking ("FAST") algorithm that tracks changes to individual lake areas and volumes over successive images. This builds on previous research by calculating supraglacial lake volumes as well as areas, and can be applied to large areas of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The FAST algorithm is being used in ongoing research into Greenland Ice Sheet hydrology. The team comprises PhD student Andrew Williamson, University Senior Lecturer Dr Neil Arnold, Leverhulme/Newton Trust Research Fellow Dr Alison Banwell, and University Senior Lecturer Dr Ian Willis.

Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

A team of nine people from Earth Sciences, took part in the Workplace Travel Challenge at the end of April 2017.

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

Earth Sciences' Jo Clegg wins a competition on sustainable food with the most sustainable recipe

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 27, 2017.

The Department of Earth Sciences is once again top amongst UK geology departments in the latest tables.

SPRI Review 2016

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 21, 2017.

SPRI Review 2016, is now available online. SPRI Review is the Annual Report issued by the Scott Polar Research Institute, giving information on the Institute's activities over the past year.

Water on Antarctic Ice Shelves

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 20, 2017.

Alison Banwell and Ian Willis, who have recently returned from Antarctica studying the effects of meltwater on the flexure and stability of ice shelves, have been commenting about two adjacent studies that have just been published in Nature. They've been commenting in Nature, The Independent, The Atlantic, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and Climate Central.

Rotating molecules create a brighter future

By from News. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

The talk was titled ‘On the Classification of the Fossil Animals Commonly Named Dinosaurs’ and it was given in 1887 by Harry Govier Seeley, Professor of Geology at King’s College, London. Seeley argued that the ‘terrible lizards’, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time, could be simply divided into two great groups – the Saurischia and the Ornithischia based on differences in their hip structure.

When did making mountains the modern way begin?

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

What with ‘tectonic shifts’ and ‘tectonic proportions’, the processes and terminology of Earth’s major structural change or tectonism have invaded everyday language. Now geological research is adding a new dimension – ‘changing tectonic regimes’, the US presidency comes to mind. So what is a ‘change in tectonic regime’?

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 27, 2017.

A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth’s climate warms out of an ice age, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and University of Louvain have combined existing ideas to solve the problem of which solar energy peaks in the last 2.6 million years led to the melting of the ice sheets and the start of a warm period.

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The living corset-animals (loriciferans) are a remarkable group of miniscule, seabed dwelling creatures, which were first found in the 1980s. Now, the discovery by palaeontologists Tom Harvey and Nick Butterfield of the loriciferans’ deep ancestry in 490 million year old Cambrian strata is helping to rewrite the story of the Cambrian explosion of life and resolve what is known as Darwin’s dilemma.

Earth Sciences students winning prizes

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

Congratulations to our students who have recently won prizes.

Tools of the Trade

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

A display showcasing a selection of the Sedgwick Museum’s unique historic collection of geological hammers.

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The first account of the geology of Cambridgeshire was published 200 years ago. Written by the Reverend Professor John Hailstone FRS (1759-1847), the ‘Outline of the Geology of Cambridgeshire’ appeared in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society of London.

New book: Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 01, 2017.

Professor of Physical Geography and Director of the Scott Polar Instititute, Julian Dowdeswell, has co-edited a new Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms. The Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms presents a comprehensive series of contributions by leading researchers from many countries that describe, discuss and illustrate landforms on the high latitude, glacier-influenced seafloor. Included are submarine glacial landforms from modern, Quaternary and ancient glacimarine environments.

Curious Objects at the University Library

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 07, 2016.

Curious Objects – an exhibition of ‘some unusual and unexpected items’ from the University Library’s collection runs from 3 Nov 2016 - 31 March 2017 at the Milstein Exhibition Centre, Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR. Free entry.

Graduate Research Opportunities

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

A full list of PhD topics for students hoping to start PhDs in 2017 with the Cambridge NERC DTP - Earth Sciences are now online.

Event: Geography and neo-vitalism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

Matthew Gandy and Michael Bravo are holding a half-day workshop on the theme of "Geography and neo-vitalism" on Wednesday 23rd November. The neo-vitalist turn in geography raises many interesting questions across the discipline including connections with the geo-humanities and new fields of interdisciplinary scholarship. In recent years the works of Henri Bergson, Hans Driesch, and other thinkers have gained influence in debates over non-human agency, post-human subjectivities, and new concepts of nature. In this workshop we wish to bring together staff and graduate students with an interest in contemporary theoretical debates for this half-day event.

Gordon Hamilton

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

We are deeply saddened by the news that Dr Gordon Hamilton died while working in the field in Antarctica earlier this month. Gordon was a PhD student at SPRI in the 1990s working with Julian Dowdeswell, now our Director, on surging Svalbard glaciers. Our thoughts are with all those close to Gordon. More information is available on the University of Maine website where Gordon was a professor in the School of Earth and Climate Sciences.

Prof Val Gibson to receive a Royal Society Athena Accolade

By from News. Published on Oct 17, 2016.

Cavendish alumni win the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics

By from News. Published on Oct 04, 2016.

SPRI Review 2015

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 05, 2016.

SPRI Review 2015, is now available online. SPRI Review is the Annual Report issued by SPRI, giving information on the Institute's activities over the past year.

International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Sep 01, 2016.

An international team of scientists is traveling to the islands of Papua New Guinea this September to study degassing from active volcanoes in remote jungles there. Some of these volcanoes are among the most active on Earth, ejecting a significant proportion of global volcanic gases into the atmosphere.

Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 02, 2016.

The ancient rugged coastline of Mistaken Point on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula face the winds and waves of the Atlantic Ocean. It can be a difficult place to work, but nevertheless it has been a mecca for geologists for over several decades now.

#iamaphysicist day was celebrated by CiW

By from News. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Prof Val Gibson appointed as Chair of the IOP Juno Team

By from News. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Ulrich Schneider awarded the Rudolf-Kaiser Prize 2015

By from News. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

An underestimated Kevan

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Douglas Palmer on the Sedgwick Museum’s giant Pliosaurus cf. kevani in the latest edition of Geoscientist

Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Collections up close, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. The discovery of new fossils of an ancient seabed dwelling hemichordate called Oesia, reveals clues about their deep ancestry which is shared with humans.

Professor Harry Elderfield tribute

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 15, 2016.

It was with great sadness that we announced the death of Harry Elderfield, on Tuesday 19 April 2016.

Virtual Scilla Collection project

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 12, 2016.

One of the questions most frequently asked by visitors to the Sedgwick Museum is what exactly are fossils and how do they form?

Visions of the Great White South exhibition to open in London

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 22, 2016.

In August 2016 "Visions of the Great White South", an exhibition to be held at Bonhams will reunite the iconic photography of Herbert Ponting with the evocative watercolours of Edward Wilson over a century after the two men first dreamt up their plan for a joint exhibition. The British Antarctic Expedition, better known by the name of its ship the Terra Nova, took place from 1910-1913. Captain Robert Falcon Scott appointed Dr Edward Wilson, a close friend and a fine watercolourist, as his chief scientist. He also invited camera artist Herbert Ponting to join the expedition as official photographer, in a bold move in an era when high quality photography required great skill and careful attention in ordinary circumstances, let alone in the extreme environment of the Antarctic. Both Wilson and Ponting captured expedition life as well as keeping a visual record of scientific phenomena that the crew were studying. Alongside the historic artworks, visitors will have the opportunity to see contemporary interpretations of the 'great white south'. For several years the Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute, with the support of Bonhams and the Royal Navy, have run an artist in residence scheme which sends an artist to the Antarctic on board the icebreaker HMS Protector. Artists including Captain Scott's grand-daughter Daphila Scott and renowned wildlife artist Darren Rees will exhibit their responses to the frozen wilds of Antarctica.

Fingerprinting rare earth elements from the air

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 21, 2016.

Over the past year, Earth Sciences’ Dr Sally Gibson has been working together with Dr Teal Riley and Dr David Neave through a University of Cambridge-BAS Joint Innovation Panel on a remote sensing technique that could aid the identification of ‘rare earth elements’ (REEs) in rocks anywhere in the world.

Explosive Earth: Earthquakes and Eruptions in Iceland

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 24, 2016.

The Cambridge Volcano Seismology group will be showcasing their latest work on the Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun dyke intrusion and fissure eruption at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 4th-10th July 2016.

Athena SWAN Bronze award

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 03, 2016.

We are very pleased to announce that the Department has been awarded its first Athena SWAN Bronze award.

Nick Bell and Ulrich Keyser win the 2016 Helmholtz Prize

By from News. Published on Apr 29, 2016.

Cambridge Physics and Astronomy Ranked Top in UK

By from News. Published on Apr 25, 2016.

Bob Carter 1942-2016

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2016.

Professor Robert Merlin Carter (known as Bob) died in January this year. Bob studied for his PhD in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge from 1964-1968.

Conference: The Historical Antarctic Sealing Industry: history, archaeology, heritage, site and artefact conservation, biodynamics and geopolitics

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 15, 2016.

This multidisciplinary conference will provide a forum for academics and heritage specialists to communicate and develop their research and expertise concerning the historical Antarctic sealing industry.

Debenham Scholarship

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 12, 2016.

The Scott Polar Research Institute is very pleased to be able to offer a Debenham Scholarship to one outstanding applicant for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies. This scholarship is worth £7,176 (2016-17 rate). The award is generously funded by a bequest from the late Barbara Debenham in memory of Frank Debenham, one of the members of Scott's 1910-1913 (Terra Nova) Expedition to the Antarctic, and founder and first Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute.

New exhibition of the historic Antarctic photographs taken by Herbert Ponting opens onboard polar tour ships

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 11, 2016.

SPRI, and Salto-Ulbeek publishers, are pleased to announce a major new partnership with the Canadian polar tour operator, One Ocean Expeditions, to exhibit limited edition platinum prints of the historic photographs taken by Herbert Ponting during Captain Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913. The exhibition of the Ponting prints opened on board the One Ocean Expeditions polar tour vessels, Akademik Ioffe and Akademik Sergei Vavilov, on 4 January 2016. The prints will be displayed on the ships until March 2018.

Physical Geography / Environmental Science PhD Opportunities 2016

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 09, 2015.

Physical Geography / Environmental Science PhD topics to start October 2016 are advertised on the Cambridge Earth System Science Doctoral Training Programme website. Members of the Geography Department / SPRI have projects advertised across all three themes of Climate, Biology and Solid Earth. Further general information about the application procedure is available.

Friends of SPRI Fundraiser

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 28, 2015.

Join multi award-winning professional wildlife photographer Andy Rouse who will take us on an inspirational journey through his favourite wildlife experiences of his illustrious career. Expect polar bears, surfing penguins and dancing tigers amongst many others. It's a fun talk packed with good humour, but with a strong conservation theme throughout. It will be an inspirational talk for all. You will also hear from Darren Rees, who has been painting for over twenty years and is one of our most decorated and highly respected wildlife artists and this year's Artist in Residence for FoSPRI.

Open Cambridge event in SPRI Library - Friday 11th September

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 26, 2015.

Explore behind the scenes at the Library at the Scott Polar Research Institute. The Library at the Scott Polar Research Institute is known as the place to find research on Polar Regions, but beyond the science and history lurks the fiction these factual records have inspired. For Open Cambridge 2015, there will be polar-based fiction from all genres on display all day with library staff on hand to answer any questions. there will also be a talk given by Library Assistant, Martin French, on the subject of Polar Fiction. For more information on this and other Open Cambridge 2015 events and for details on how to book, please visit the Open Cambridge website.

After the Iron curtain: Poor parenting and state intervention in cross cultural perspective: a one-day workshop

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 01, 2015.

This workshop, on Wednesday June 10th 2015, is concerned with the issue of 'poor' parenting in cross-cultural perspective, and particularly a UK comparison with post-Soviet countries. Taken at face value, the concept of 'poor' parenting may look very different in countries with different political, ideological and socio-economic structures such as liberal democracies of the UK and the US, yet one study has revealed some (tentative) similarities in child welfare practices. This workshop problematizes the concept of 'poor' parenting by making it an analytical concept and placing it in a comparative context, asking three main questions: (1) What constitutes 'poor' parenting in a particular country? (2) What are the underlying concepts of childhood and parenthood this relies on? (3) What are the similarities in child welfare practices, and how do we account for these?

Visit SPRI Prints

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 26, 2015.

The Scott Polar Research Institute is pleased to offer high quality prints from our unique collection. Images are available in various sizes, framed or unframed. Visit SPRIPrints.com.

The Polar Museums Network: Connecting polar collections around the world

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 07, 2015.

SPRI is pleased to announce the launch of the Polar Museums Network (PMN), a new initiative which brings together polar museums and collections around the world to strengthen and spread the knowledge of polar history, science and exploration. The PMN will foster greater cooperation and collaboration amongst polar museums in the key areas of exhibitions, research, outreach and learning, documentation and conservation. The Polar Museum at SPRI is one of the six founding members of the network.