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Papa Momodou Jack's research will focus on access to healthcare in Ethiopia.

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 21, 2018.

Papa Momodou Jack, a Gates Cambridge Scholar who will start his PhD with the Department this October, discusses his research on access to healthcare in Ethiopia, which will focus on Community-Based Health Insurance.

Researchers join new initiative on urban air pollution

By rg580 from News. Published on Jun 20, 2018.

Image courtesy of the Department of Chemistry

Researchers here are part of a cutting-edge new project unveiled by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan today to better understand Londoners’ exposure to air pollution and improve air quality in the capital.

Dr Thomas Bennett wins ISIS Science Impact Award 2018

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 19, 2018.

Dr Thomas Bennett has won the ISIS Science Impact Award for his work using neutrons to help reveal the structure of a melt-quenched metal-organic framework glass - the first example of the new hybrid glass family.

The ISIS Impact Awards are presented by the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source ...

Researchers move into new Chemistry of Health building

By rg580 from News. Published on Jun 18, 2018.

Researchers are now moving into our new Chemistry of Health building – a state-of-the-art space for the study of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases – which is just being completed.

Lessons learnt from 100 years of coastal flooding in the UK with Professor Ivan Haigh- Monday 25th June 2018

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 18, 2018.

Biogeography and Biogeomorphology Research Group- Easter Term Seminar Join Professor Haigh (Associate Professor in Coastal Oceanography, University of Southampton) for a seminar on "Lessons learnt from 100 years of coastal flooding in the UK". Mon 25 June, 12 noon-1pm Room 101, Hardy Building, Downing Site Please see attached poster for further information. ALL WELCOME

New book: A French Reading Revolution?

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 15, 2018.

A new book from Dr Alan Baker, A French Reading Revolution? The Development, Distribution and Cultural Significance of Bibliothèques populaires, 1860–1900, explores the history, geography and cultural significance of library associations in France. Portrayal of the general situation in France as a whole is paralleled by detailed work on the unpublished archives of nine départements widely located throughout the country.

Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease

By rg580 from News. Published on Jun 12, 2018.

Detailed brain cell analysis has helped a group of researchers - including scientists here in the Department of Chemistry - uncover new mechanisms thought to underlie Parkinson's disease.

Undergraduate Open Days this July

By rg580 from News. Published on Jun 11, 2018.

Image courtesy of the Department of Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry will be taking part in the University Open Days on Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July. These offer prospective undergraduates the opportunity to find out what it is like to study here.

A knighthood for leading Alzheimer's researcher

By rg580 from News. Published on Jun 11, 2018.

A leading reseacher whose work has helped bring vital advances in our understanding of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases has received a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours.  

Long-term recruitment dynamics of Arctic dwarf shrub communities in coastal east Greenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 11, 2018.

Cambridge's Tree-Ring Group, led by Prof. Ulf Büntgen from the Department of Geography, as well as colleagues from Germany (Freiburg) and Switzerland (Birmensdorf), published a pioneering study on long-term recruitment dynamics of Arctic dwarf shrub communities in the journal Dendrochronologia. Encouraged by their new findings, Cambridge's Tree-Ring Group will continue to expand their fieldwork beyond forests.

Tidings of joy

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 11, 2018.

Pei Rong Cheo, who is studying for an MPhil in Conservation Leadership with the Department, tells us about her citizen science programme, which trains volunteers to monitor marine life.

Postgraduate Open Day - 2 November 2018

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 07, 2018.

The University of Cambridge, alongside the Cambridge Departments and Colleges, invite you to the Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day on Friday 2 November 2018. The day is open to all those seeking to apply for postgraduate study at the University and will provide opportunities to meet department...

Dating the emplacement of the Shap granite using zircon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 07, 2018.

G5a - the distinctive coarse-grained, pink granite exposed at Shap in Cumbria - has long been a favourite igneous hand specimen for Earth Sciences teaching in Cambridge. New research uses the age of zircon crystal formation to suggest a long gestation period in the mid-crust before its final emplacement 405 million years ago.

Professor Bhaskar Vira presented with Busk Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 07, 2018.

Professor Bhaskar Vira recieved the Royal Geographical Society's Busk Medal on Monday (04 June 2018), at a ceremony at Lowther Lodge. Professor Vira was presented with the award for interdisciplinary research on economy, environment and development.

L'Oréal UNESCO For Women in Science award for Dr Emma Liu

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 04, 2018.

Congratulations to Dr Emma Liu, Leverhulme Research Fellow in Volcanology, who has been awarded a 2018 L’Oreal UNESCO For Women In Science fellowship to support her postdoctoral research.

World Dendro Conference 2018 (2nd-22nd June)

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 01, 2018.

The 10th World Dendro Conference, which is this year organised by the University of Cambridge Geography Department, begins next week in Bhutan. The Department's Paul Krusic, Ulf Buentgen, and Clive Oppenheimer will all be speaking. Tickets are sold out, but watch this space for videos and news from the conference.

New: Infrastructural Geographies Blog

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jun 01, 2018.

We are pleased to announce that the Infrastructural Geographies Research Group have launched a new blog, Via. The blog will keep you updated of the goings-on in the research group, and highlight and debate the wide-range of approaches to the concept of "infrastructure" the group covers.

Framing the Challenge of Climate Change in Nature and Science Editorials

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 31, 2018.

A team of researchers led by the Department's Professor Mike Hulme have released a new paper, "Framing the Challenge of Climate Change in Nature and Science Editorials". The study analyses 50 years (1966-2016) of editorials dealing with climate change in the prestige science journals Science and Nature. It reveals the changing ways over time these journals have framed the challenges of climate change.

The researcher measuring pollution in classrooms

By rg580 from News. Published on May 30, 2018.

Image: Department of Chemistry Photography

"I really hope the issue of indoor air pollution will attract more attention now. It’s a significant part of our exposure to pollution, because we spend 90% of our time indoors, and particularly affects children." 

Exploring alternative forms of power

By rg580 from News. Published on May 24, 2018.

Image courtesy of Gates Cambridge

Sandile Mtetwa wants to transform the energy sector in her country. She'll begin a PhD here this autumn, investigating alternative energy sources that can produce and store hydrogen and could give Zimbabwe access to cost effective solar energy.

CRASSH Faculty Research Group funds for GENUS

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 24, 2018.

Dr Lemanski has successfully received funds to run a CRASSH Faculty Research Group for the 2018-19 academic year, for the newly-launched Global Energy Nexus in Urban Settlements research group (GENUS). The funds will enable GENUS to meet regularly, to invite outside speakers, consolidate existing links, and extend their interests to new scholars and research projects.

Controls can help prevent hunting having an evolutionary impact

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 24, 2018.

An international team of researchers, including the Department's Professor Ulf Büntgen, studied the hunting of Alpine ibex, finding that due to tight regulations the hunting wasn't causing an evolutionary effect. Whilst ibex with longer than average horns are more likely to be shot than animals of the same age with shorter horns, tight hunting regulations meant that hunters tend to shoot as few animals as possible, and so too few are taken to cause an evolutionary effect.

Dr Lemanski awarded British Academy 'Writing Workshops' grant

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 21, 2018.

Dr Charlotte Lemanski has been awarded a British Academy Writing Workshop Award, to run a workshop on 'Governing for Urban Inclusion' in collaboration with Dr Richard Ballard from the Gauteng City Regional Observatory in South Africa. The workshop will take place towards the end of 2018 in Johannesburg, and will enable early-career scholars situated in South Africa to receive academic support in developing an article for submission to an international peer-review journal, as well as advice related to securing grants, and developing policy-briefs related to research.

2018 Open Days

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 21, 2018.

The 2018 Department of Geography Open Days will take place on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th July. Come along and find out what it is like to study with us!

Universities and Science Minister for England visits the Department

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 17, 2018.

Sam Gyimah MP,  Universities and Science Minister for England, visited the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge on the 16th May 2018. During a tour of the Department facilities and laboratories, he met with postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers...

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 17, 2018.

A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought.

Drs Ian Willis and Alison Banwell awarded Fellowships at the University of Colorado Boulder

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 16, 2018.

Ian Willis and Alison Banwell have been awarded, respectively, a 1-year sabbatical fellowship and a 2-year post-doctoral fellowship to undertake collaborative work with Waleed Abdalati and Michael Willis (no relation!) at the Co-operative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and Ted Scambos at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. They will advance their current work investigating the surface hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the surface hydrology and stability of Antarctic ice shelves.

Drs Ian Willis and Alison Banwell awarded Fellowships at the University of Colorado Boulder

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 16, 2018.

Ian Willis and Alison Banwell have been awarded, respectively, a 1-year sabbatical fellowship and a 2-year post-doctoral fellowship to undertake collaborative work with Waleed Abdalati and Michael Willis (no relation!) at the Co-operative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and Ted Scambos at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. They will advance their current work investigating the surface hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the surface hydrology and stability of Antarctic ice shelves.

Department members win 2018 IoM3 awards

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 10, 2018.

The IoM3 (Premier Awards) Gold Medal and Griffith Medal & Prize have been awarded to members of the Department.  Congratulations to Dr Howard Stone (and his team) and Prof Ruth Cameron!

The Gold Medal has been awarded to the Materials Strategic Partnership. This is a premier award...

New book: A Companion to Environmental Studies

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 10, 2018.

A new student reference book has just been published by Routledge, 'A companion to environmental studies', edited by Mike Hulme, together with Noel Castree and Jim Proctor. The book presents a comprehensive and interdisciplinary overview of around 150 key issues, debates, concepts, approaches and questions that together define environmental studies today. The volume covers approaches from environmental and social science, all the way through to humanistic and post-natural perspectives on the biophysical world.

New interdisciplinary research group on energy and cities launched

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 09, 2018.

A new inter-disciplinary research group 'Global Energy Nexus in Urban Settlements' that brings together colleagues from Engineering, Architecture, Geography and the Judge Business School has launched. This is based in the Infrastructural Geographies Research Group, with Dr Charlotte Lemanski as the geography lead.

2017 Macro Group UK Young Researchers Medal awarded to Dr Rachel Evans

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 08, 2018.

This year's Macro Group UK Young Researchers Medal has been awarded to Dr Rachel Evans.  

The Macro Group UK Young Researchers Medal is awarded annually to a UK based scientist with up to 12 years of experience since completion of PhD on December 31st of the preceding year (exclusive of...

Geographies of Knowledge annual lecture: Esther Turnhout, 10th May

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 08, 2018.

Professor Esther Turnhout, Professor in forest and nature conservation policy, Wageningen University, will be speaking on "Space of Biodiversity Expertise" for the Geographies of Knowledge group's annual lecture. In this talk, Esther explores a number of sites where biodiversity expertise is produced. These will include examples in the Netherlands and draw on her experiences as an expert and lead author for the Intergovernmental Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Particular focus will be on two interrelated logics that are prominent in biodiversity expertise: that of policy relevance and that of assessment. Esther's argument is that these two logics together prioritise model projections over other forms of expertise. The lecture concludes by discussing the scope for doing things differently and breaking through dominant logics. 4.30pm-5.30pm, Thursday 10th May 2018 Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Professor Bhaskar Vira awarded the Royal Geographical Society's Busk Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 08, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Bhaskar Vira, who has been awarded the Royal Geographical Society's Busk Medal in recognition of his interdisciplinary research on economy, environment and development. The medal will be presented on 4 June as part of the Society's Annual General Meeting in London. Bhaskar Vira is Professor of Political Economy at the Department of Geography, and Director of the University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute, and interdisciplinary research centre looking at biodiversity.

Dr Somaiyeh Falahat releases new book "Cities and Metaphors".

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 04, 2018.

Dr Somaiyeh Falahat has released a new book Cities and Metaphors. Introducing a new concept of urban space,the book encourages a theoretical realignment of how the city is experienced, thought and discussed. Dr Falahat is currently a Feodor-Lynen research fellow at Department of Geography and a research associate at Trinity Hall college, University of Cambridge. Her recent research explores milieus of urban modernity in the early 20th century Tehran.

Professor Mike Hulme on "The Climate Fetish"

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 04, 2018.

Professor Mike Hulme discusses "The Climate Fetish" on the Australian Science Friction radio show on national station ABC.

Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum - registration open

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 03, 2018.

Registration is now open for our next Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum - a free event on Tuesday 12th June which focuses on advancements in Materials Science and includes the Kelly Lecture which will be given by Prof Peter Bruce on "Materially better batteries" as well as a series of...

Cambridge Uni graphene spin-out Paragraf gets $3.9M

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on May 03, 2018.

Congratulations to the Centre for Gallium Nitride group team comprising of Colin Humphreys, Simon Thomas and Ivor Guiney in successfully raising £2.9M in VC funds for their spin out Paragraf. Paragraf is developing functionally active graphene with properties targeted at final device-specific...

Book launch for Mathilda Rosengren

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 03, 2018.

Rethinking Urban Nature PhD candidate, Mathilda Rosengren has a new book out published by transcript. Urban Appropriation Strategies – Exploring Space-making Practices in Contemporary European Cityscapes edited by Flavia Alice Mameli, Franziska Polleter, Mathilda Rosengren, Josefine Sarkez-Knudsen, builds on their work from the University of Kassel workshop. The book launch will take place on 22 May 2018 at Pro qm Berlin.

Research Assistant/Associate in Remote Sensing of Forests

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on May 01, 2018.

Applications are invited for a Research Assistant/ Research Associate to work under the direction of Dr Gareth Rees, for a British Council funded research project mapping the distribution and spatial characteristics of forests in northern Russia, using remote sensing techniques. The closing date for applications is 25th May 2018.

Research Assistant/Associate in Remote Sensing of Forests

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 01, 2018.

Applications are invited for a Research Assistant/ Research Associate to work under the direction of Dr Gareth Rees, for a British Council funded research project mapping the distribution and spatial characteristics of forests in northern Russia, using remote sensing techniques. The closing date for applications is 25th May 2018.

Major research project planned into collapse of the Thwaites Glacier

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Apr 30, 2018.

Dr Poul Christoffersen will co-lead one of eight projects in a new joint UK-US research programme, that is one of the most detailed and extensive examinations of a massive Antarctic glacier ever undertaken. Dr Christoffersen's project, Thwaites Interdisciplinary Margin Evolution (TIME), will investigate how the margins of the Thwaites Glacier drainage basin will evolve and influence ice flow over the coming decades.

Major research project planned into collapse of the Thwaites Glacier

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 30, 2018.

Dr Poul Christoffersen will co-lead one of eight projects in a new joint UK-US research programme, that is one of the most detailed and extensive examinations of a massive Antarctic glacier ever undertaken. Dr Christoffersen's project, Thwaites Interdisciplinary Margin Evolution (TIME), will investigate how the margins of the Thwaites Glacier drainage basin will evolve and influence ice flow over the coming decades.

University Challenge Win

By Tony Gledhill from News. Published on Apr 26, 2018.

 

Congratulations to James Devine-Stoneman who captained the winning team on BBC Two University Challenge!

It is the first time since the show aired in 1962 that a PhD student in the Department has won the televised quiz show and also the first win by St John’s College, Cambridge...

Professor Julian Dowdeswell elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Apr 26, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Julian Dowdeswell on being elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales. Fellows to the Society are elected in recognition of academic excellence.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 26, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Julian Dowdeswell on being elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales. Fellows to the Society are elected in recognition of academic excellence.

Cambridge Earth Sciences once again top amongst UK geology departments in the Complete University Guide

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 25, 2018.

The Department is delighted to be placed first amongst UK geology departments once again.

1000 km down: seismologists probe the mid-mantle

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 24, 2018.

Many questions remain unanswered about the mid-mantle, 600 to 1200 km below Earth’s surface. Does this layer decouple convection between the upper and lower mantle? How are processes here linked to plate tectonics and volcanism? Cambridge Earth Scientists are using seismic constraints to determine the compositional heterogeneity in the mid-mantle. They hope to identify processes which could obstruct or divert convection 1000 km down.

Jim Charles 1926-2017

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Apr 19, 2018.

James Anthony Charles, universally known as Jim, was born on 23 August 1926 in Ardrossan, Ayrshire.  He had just one sister who survived infancy, Mary, eleven years his senior.  His parents John H.V. Charles (JHVC) and Winifred L. Charles, had both grown up in Cambridge.  They moved north in...

Brachiopods prove tougher than previously thought

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 18, 2018.

A remarkable 120-year record of resilience to environmental change in the world’s oceans has been uncovered within a group of marine organisms called brachiopods. Although they are not well known today, brachiopods have had considerable importance in the evolution of seabed life.

Subglacial lakes discovered under Devon Island ice cap

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 18, 2018.

A new study of the Devon Island ice cap, led by a team from the University of Alberta, has discovered two subglacial bodies of water. These are the first subglacial lakes to be observed in the Canadian Arctic, and are estimated to cover areas of five and eight square kilometres respectively. The findings, co-authored by Director of The Scott Polar Research Institute Professor Julian Dowdeswell, have been published in Science Advances

Hot, warm or cold?: new insight into how columnar jointing forms

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 13, 2018.

A new study by researchers at the University of Liverpool, with contributions from Cambridge Earth Sciences PhD student Fiona Iddon, has identified the temperature at which cooling magma cracks to form geometric columns such as those found at the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland.

Two billion year old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphere

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 12, 2018.

A two billion year old chunk of sea salt provides new evidence for the transformation of Earth's atmosphere into an oxygenated environment capable of supporting life as we know it.

Scientific expedition to the Larsen C Ice Shelf

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 11, 2018.

A planned scientific expedition to the Antarctic to visit and study the Larsen C Ice Shelf - and explore the area where Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship was last seen - will be led by Professor Julian Dowdeswell next year. Professor Dowdeswell, Director of the Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, will lead the international Weddell Sea Expedition 2019 next spring. It will bring together leading researchers from the Institute as well as the Nekton Foundation, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, the University of Cape Town and the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme this morning, Professor Dowdeswell explained that the expedition will survey the underside of the iceshelf using underwater submersibles, to ascertain whether conditions leading to the calving of an enormous iceberg from Larsen C in 2017 means that the shelf may collapse: "Iceshelves butress the interior of the Antarctic icesheet, they effectively act to hold back the ice that flows from the interior of the Antarctic to the edge. They are in some senses vulnerable because not only can they lose mass by the production of icebergs at their edge but also because they're floating, beneath they have ocean water flowing in and that ocean water can lead to meltrates at the base of a number of metres per year and this is what's been happening to some areas of Antarctica." Further coverage also features on BBC News, Telegraph and Independent websites.

Department of Geography at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 09, 2018.

Several staff, postdocs, PhD students and research associates within the Department of Geography and Scott Polar Research Institute will be showcasing their research at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) 8-13 April 2018, the largest geosciences meeting in Europe. Details of the presentations and our research groups are available.

Four Department winners - CSAR PhD Student Awards 2018!

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Apr 05, 2018.

The Cambridge Society for the Application of Research (CSAR) recently announced the names of the 10 PhD students from the University of Cambridge who have received the 2018 CSAR PhD Student Awards for Applied Research.  Four of the award winners are Materials Scientists: Alexander Avramenko,...

Inuit Visions of the Polar World

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 05, 2018.

Dr Michael Bravo will be running an interactive talk, Inuit Visions of the Polar World, at the Heong Gallery, Downing College. The talk will take place at 6pm, on Thursday 10 May 2018. Please register if you would like to attend.

Observing deep carbon with an Icelandic volcano

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2018.

An important new chemical dataset from the basalt lavas of the Icelandic Borgarhraun volcano is helping Cambridge earth scientists John Maclennan and Dan McKenzie with colleagues from the US and Iceland estimate the carbon dioxide content of Earth’s mantle. Borgarhraun is one of the few places in the world from where it is possible to probe the mantle CO2. This new data, published in the latest issue of Geology will improve understanding of the link between volcanism and long-term climate change.

ERC Arctic Cultures Post-docs

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 22, 2018.

Dr. Richard Powell is recruiting FOUR three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates (PDRAs) to work on the ERC Consolidator Grant project, ARCTIC CULT (Arctic Cultures: Sites of Collection in the Formation of the European and American Northlands) to start in October 2018. Further details are available online. The closing date is 30th April 2018.

Abel Prize: Robert P. Langlands wins 2018 award for "completely new way of thinking about mathematics"

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Mar 20, 2018.

Tuesday 20th March 2018 - 12:45

 

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has awarded the 2018 Abel Prize to Robert P. Langlands (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton) “for his visionary program connecting representation theory to number theory”.  

(press release follows)

Inuit Trails

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 16, 2018.

Dr Michael Bravo's Pan Inuit Trails project, which maps part of the extensive trail network used for Inuit travel across the North American continent, is featured in the Guardian article 'Counter-mapping: cartography that lets the powerless speak'. You can find out more about the project at paninuittrails.org.

Chain reaction of fast-draining lakes poses new risk for Greenland ice sheet

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 15, 2018.

A growing network of lakes on the Greenland ice sheet has been found to drain in a chain reaction that speeds up the flow of the ice sheet, threatening its stability. Researchers from the SPRI and others across the UK, Norway, US and Sweden have used a combination of 3D computer modelling and real-world observations to show the previously unknown, yet profound dynamic consequences tied to a growing number of lakes forming on the Greenland ice sheet.

Preliminary works begin on the Cavendish 3 site

By from News. Published on Mar 14, 2018.

As part of the verification of technical aspects of the design of Cavendish III, two large concrete slabs have this week been cast on the site of the new building. The area depicted will ultimately form the base of the cycle storage under the raised plaza.

New paper: Controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in West Greenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 08, 2018.

A team of researchers from the Scott Polar Research Institute have published a new paper investigating the causes of rapid lake-drainage events on the Greenland Ice Sheet. For this, the research team assembled a variety of different remotely sensed datasets to derive a series of controls that might explain why some lakes drain rapidly and others do not. However, among the controls investigated, they were unable to find any statistically significant drivers of the lake-drainage process. The team includes PhD student Andrew Williamson, Dr Ian Willis, Dr Neil Arnold and Dr Alison Banwell.

Prof Val Gibson "Equality Champion"

By from News. Published on Mar 07, 2018.

Piers Vitebsky elected Honorary Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the Sakha Republic

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 06, 2018.

Piers Vitebsky, Assistant Director of Research (Retired) at the Scott Polar Research Institute, has been elected an Honorary Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia.

Evolution of land plants transformed sedimentation on Earth

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 01, 2018.

The vegetation of our planet irrevocably changed surface processes on Earth. New research suggests the evolution of land plants in the Ordovician caused an increase in the volume of mud preserved on the continents. This marked a change in global sedimentation, with implications for the study of sedimentary processes on our planet and beyond.

SPRI MPhil Scholarships

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 01, 2018.

The deadline for the Debenham Scholarship and the Scott Polar Scholarship is 31 March 2018. Each scholarship is worth £7,614 (2018-19 rate) and will be awarded to the best applicant for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies who is not in receipt of another University award. By applying for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies, you will automatically be entered into the competition for these awards, as long as your application is received by the deadline.

Investigating the warm climate stability of the West Antarctic ice sheet

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Recent modelling studies predict that anthropogenic warming could lead to the loss of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the next few centuries, and a big rise in sea level.

AHRC Doctoral studentship: Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956-present

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded studentship at the University of Cambridge, Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) and Royal Society. The PhD studentship is one of six awards being made by the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership with the Science Museums and Archives Consortium. The project is full-time, funded for three years and begins in October 2018. It will be supervised by Dr Richard Powell (Scott Polar Research Institute and Department of Geography, University of Cambridge), Dr Catherine Souch (RGS-IBG) and Keith Moore (Royal Society), with technical training support from Charlotte Connelly (Polar Museum, Cambridge).

Blue mussel shape is a powerful indicator of environmental change

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 12, 2018.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge and British Antarctic Survey have developed a new method to identify natural patterns of shell shape variation in common blue mussels.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell awarded 2018 Lyell Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 02, 2018.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, has been awarded the 2018 Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London for significant contributions to the science through a substantial body of work. The Lyell Medal has been awarded since 1876 and is the Society's highest award for 'soft rock' geology. It was established with a gift from the distinguished 19th Century scientist Charles Lyell who wrote the 'Principles of Geology'.

CANCELLED: Studying Arctic Fields

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 31, 2018.

The Launch for Richard Powell's new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Culturers, Practices, and Environmental Sciences will be held at SPRI at 4.30 p.m., Monday 26 February 2018. This event is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen's University Press. Please RSVP Jenny Dunstall to attend.

Pteropods tougher than thought

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 29, 2018.

Elegant little sea butterflies, more technically known as pteropods, are important members of the marine ecosystem because they are so abundant and are a food source for other marine organisms, especially whales.

New paper on the impact of glaciation on East Anglian Fenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 25, 2018.

A new paper from Professor Phil Gibbard, "Pleistocene glaciation of Fenland, England, and its implications for evolution of the region", demonstrates for the first time that the form and scale of modern Fenland, East Anglia, is due to glaciation during the late Middle Pleistocene period, around 160,000 years ago.

RAS Gold Medal for Professor Robert White

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 22, 2018.

Congratulations to Robert (Bob) White, Professor of Geophysics and Fellow of St Edmund’s College, who has been awarded the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal for a lifetime of distinguished achievement in solid Earth geophysics.

The beginnings of communal life – 565 million years ago

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 18, 2018.

Ancient rock strata exposed within the World Heritage Site of Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland, record one of Life's very first communities of seabed dwelling macro-organisms. Known as the Ediacaran biota, it is around 565 million years old.

Using GAIA to detect low frequency gravitational waves

By from News. Published on Jan 11, 2018.

Prof Bernard Silverman FRS: longtime INI supporter knighted in New Year's Honours

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jan 02, 2018.

Tuesday 2nd January 2018 - 16:15

 

The Institute would like to extend its warmest congratulations to Professor Bernard Silverman - a long-time friend and supporter of INI - who has been knighted in the New Year's Honours list 2018.

Going underground: Cambridge digs into the history of geology with landmark exhibition

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

A box full of diamonds, volcanic rock from Mount Vesuvius, and the geology guide that Darwin packed for his epic voyage on the Beagle are on display at the Cambridge University Library as part of the first major exhibition to celebrate geological map-making.

Rescued radar maps reveal Antarctica's past

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

An international team of researchers has scanned and digitised two million records held at the Scott Polar Research Institute from pioneering aeroplane radar expeditions that criss-crossed the frozen continent in the 1960s and 1970s. The digitized data extend the record of changes at the bottom of the ice sheet, such as the formation of channels as Antarctica's ice flows, by more than two decades. The work could also help researchers get a better handle on how the ice sheet might respond as global temperatures rise. Read more in Nature and on Stanford University's website.

Postgraduate Engagement Fellowship - apply now

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

Postgraduate students have until 15th January 2018 to apply to be an Engagement Fellow at the Polar Museum at SPRI. This is a paid opportunity thanks to the generous support of the British Society for the History of Science. Applicants do not need specialist polar or climate knowledge - we are looking for somebody who is enthusiastic about communicating historical ideas about our changing climate. Full training and support will be given. Further details are available on the British Society for the History of Science website.

Invited expert review for the IPCC

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 16, 2017.

Professor Tom Spencer has been invited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to act as an Expert Reviewer of pre-release, internal draft material on 'extremes, abrupt changes and managing risks' as part of the IPCC's Special Report on the Ocean and the Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).

Interview: "Form in Art" contributing artist Manoel Veiga

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Dec 07, 2017.

Thursday 7th December 2017 - 15:00

 

Since 20 November 2017, INI has played host to the art exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form". Run concurrently with the "Growth form and self-organisation" programme, it has aimed to "explore the relationship between form, as understood mathematically, and art" and features works from 10 leading contemporary artists.

At the exhibition's launch event, and shortly before he returned to his native Sao Paulo, we interviewed one of the contributing artists: Manoel Veiga.

 

The Geological Anthropocene born in Burlington House

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 06, 2017.

Discussions concerning the recognition and potential definition of a new division of geological time during which humans have become overarchingly influencing natural systems have led to the proposal to define a new time interval, the Anthropocene (see earlier reports on these pages). The controversy generated in the geological world has been offset by the remarkable interest the concept has initiated in non-geological, and especially in non-scientific fields. The discussions, initiated during meetings of the Geological Society's Stratigraphy Commission, of which Professor Phil Gibbard, Dr Colin Summerhayes, and the other authors are members, has led to worldwide debate. These discussions have also spawned new lines of research, and encouraged inter-disciplinary discussions by members of the department, involving reseachers and students alike. A new report presents the state of these fast evolving discussions developments that have animated the normally tranquil world of stratigraphy.

Recruiting now: Polar Museum - Collections Coordinator

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 01, 2017.

The Polar Museum is looking for an organised and enthusiastic museum professional to manage its collection of polar artefacts and artworks. The Collections Coordinator is responsible for a range of tasks including facilitating collections research, answering external enquiries, undertaking and improving documentation of the Museum's collections, negotiating and administering loans and ensuring that the collections are appropriately stored and displayed. In addition they support the wider activity of the museum as needed. This is an exciting time to join the Scott Polar Research Institute as we approach our centenary year in 2020. With over 50,000 visitors a year and activities that include exhibitions, events and teaching, work in the Polar Museum team is always varied. Find out more on our vacancies page.

Video interviews: INI programme Organisers

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 24, 2017.

Friday 24th November 2017 - 12:00

 

** 11/06/18 - this page will no longer be updated, please see our video interviews page for this and all future content. **

Enhancing the growth of plants on inhospitable land using a biological fertiliser

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

A simple mixture of organic waste, such as chicken manure and zeolite, a porous volcanic mineral, has been developed into a powerful bio-fertiliser which can also reclaim semi-arid and contaminated land.

Inverse Problems Network meeting, 23-24 November 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

Monday 20th November 2017 - 14:45

 

INI is pleased to welcome the EPSRC-funded Inverse Problems Network, which will hold a two day meeting at the Institute on 23-24 November. 

The meeting will commence with a 12.00 lunch held in the common room of the maths campus' nearby Pavilion F. The talks, meanwhile, will be held in INI's Seminar Room 1. 

There is no need to register, and full details of the event can be found via the following link: http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/invprob2/showtt.php

 

 

 

 

Rising Tides bring innovation prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Victoria Herrmann, a PhD student at the Scott Polar Research Institute and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, has won a prestigious US social entrepreneurship prize for a research project on US towns and cities at risk of partial submersion due to climate change. Victoria's was one of 10 projects to scoop the JM Kaplan Fund Innovation Prize. Her winning Rising Tides project will create a new online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities.

"More Tales of our Forefathers" - a talk by Professor Barry Simon, 13 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 16:15


"More Tales of our Forefathers"
Professor Barry Simon 
13 December 2017

14:00-16:30

 

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium - 12 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 12:45

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium

"Form in Art: Art of Form" - an INI exhibition, November-December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 09, 2017.

Thursday 9th November 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to announce that this autumn we will be hosting the public exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form".

Collaborating on carbon capture and storage

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

Cambridge Earth Sciences is part of a global project researching new sites for carbon capture and storage (CCS), supported by leading multinational minerals and energy company BHP.

Printable poster of INI Programmes & Workshops 2018

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

Thursday 19th October 2017 - 12:30

 

Throughout 2018 the Isaac Newton Institute will be hosting a total of four programmes and 17 workshops.

For ease of reference, we have produced the below poster showing the year's schedule along with basic details of the key events.

If you would like to download, share or print the poster, please click here to access the PDF.

Printable poster of UNQ programme schedule

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Wednesday 18th October 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to be hosting the UNQ programme from January to June 2018. This collaboration of uncertainty quantification researchers comprises four main workshops, for which applications are currently open.

If you would like to download, print or share a poster of the programme's schedule (pictured below) then please click here to access the PDF.

Award winning researchers in Earth Sciences

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Congratulations to our researchers who have recently won awards.

Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

Dr Elizabeth Harper has been appointed Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum following the retirement of Dr Ken McNamara.

100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

To mark 100 years since John E Marr became Woodwardian Professor, on 30 October 1917, a selection of documents have been digitised and will be available to view on the Sedgwick Museum website from 30 October.

Plate Tectonics at 50

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 06, 2017.

The Geological Society of London has launched its new archive of Emeritus Professor Dan McKenzie’s work.

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 31, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

We were very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 13, 2017.

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 10, 2017.

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.

Don’s Diary

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 05, 2017.

This article first appeared in CAM - the Cambridge Alumni Magazine – Issue 81 Easter 2017. Professor Marian Holness is Professor of Petrology and a Fellow of Trinity College.

‘Plumerang’ health risk

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 21, 2017.

Scientists have discovered that significant changes can occur in the composition of volcanic eruptive plumes whilst circulating high above the atmosphere. Nicknamed ‘plumerangs’, the evolution of such plumes represent a previously unappreciated health hazard.

Engaging with Science Policy

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 09, 2017.

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.