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Cambridge Geographer gives annual lecture in Finland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 19, 2018.

PhD student Isabel Airas gave an annual 'Studia Generalia' lecture to over two hundred 16- and 17-year old students at her former school, Tölö Gymnasium, in Helsinki, Finland, on 16 October. She spoke about her research into populist politics and the Sweden Democrats – with particular relevance to the Finns who go to the polls in April 2019. She also talked about her experience of doing her PhD at the Department of Geography in Cambridge.

RESIST in the German press

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 18, 2018.

Over the summer German newspapers and radio featured coverage of the Hydralab+ EU funded experiment of which RESIST soil cores form an integral part. RESIST explores the interaction between salt marshes and changing tidal conditions and is led by a team including Cambridge's Iris Moeller, Tom Spencer, Ben Evans and Helen Brooks.

Taking to the skies: measuring volcanic gas emissions using drones

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2018.

Many of the world’s most hazardous volcanoes are either too remote or too active to make measurements safely from the ground. Cambridge Earth Scientists are now taking to the skies to investigate the gases being released by these elusive volcanoes.

Goldsmiths’ Company Funds Cambridge Research in Precious Metals

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Oct 16, 2018.

A gift from the Goldsmiths’ Company Charity to support three new PhD studentships at Cambridge will advance research in precious metals and help develop new technical expertise.  The Goldsmiths’ Company programme in precious metals research, which will be based at Cambridge’s Department of...

Welcoming prospective postgraduates

By rg580 from News. Published on Oct 15, 2018.

Image: Department of Chemistry

Our popular Open Day for prospective postgraduate students takes place this Friday, 19th October 2018. Anyone interested in pursuing a further degree in Chemistry at Cambridge is welcome.

‘Against the odds’ discovery creates new tool for adding functions to proteins

By rg580 from News. Published on Oct 15, 2018.

Using a chemical reaction that "really shouldn’t work” on an under-explored and not very reactive amino acid, researchers have developed a new system for adding functions to proteins that could be used to deliver drugs to targeted cells.

Vacancy: INI-ICMS Chair of Correspondents

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 12, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Friday 12th October 2018 - 15:00


The Isaac Newton Institute (INI) and International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS) seek to appoint a new Chair of Correspondents from 1st January 2019. The principal role of Chair of Correspondents is to assist in the coordination of the activity of the Correspondents Network in linking the two Institutes with the UK mathematical sciences community. The post-holder will serve a 3-year term, which is renewable.

Materials Science Postgraduate Open Day - 2nd November

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Oct 11, 2018.

Interested in postgraduate study?  Come to the Department on Friday 2 November to hear about our research opportunities and taught courses, meet the academic staff, and have a guided tour with current students. All prospective students welcome.  Chartered coach departing from Cambridge city...

Austerity cuts ‘twice as deep’ in England than rest of Britain

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 09, 2018.

Latest research by Dr Mia Gray and Dr Anna Barford finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010. The authors of the new paper, published today in the Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, say the findings demonstrate how austerity has been pushed down to a local level, "intensifying territorial injustice" between areas.

The Department of Geography Centenary Programme is released

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 08, 2018.

The Department is proud to announce its Centenary Programme, marking 100 years of the Department of Geography and celebrating the achievements of our many alumni. The programme will begin with our Centenary lecture series, starting on Thursday 25 October 2018, with Professor Linda McDowell of the University of Oxford speaking on 'Border Crossings: geographies of class, gender, mobility and migration'. All welcome!

Cambridge chemist honoured with Nobel

By dh473 from News. Published on Oct 04, 2018.

Courtesy Trinity College, Cambridge

Department alumnus Sir Greg Winter has been jointly awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

UK announces new Arctic defence strategy

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 04, 2018.

Cambridge geographer Dr. Richard Powell was interviewed by Radio Canada International about the recent announcement of a new British Arctice Defence Strategy.

The Great Austerity Debate tour starts next week

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 04, 2018.

The Great Austerity Debate: the forum theatre project devised by Dr Mia Gray and Professor Susan Smith in collaboration with Menagerie Theatre Company is going on tour. The project, in which audience members can intervene within the workings of the play, explores the impact of austerity policy upon different groups within society. The tour starts at The Old Firehouse, Oxford, on Monday 9 October.

UK announces new Arctic defence strategy

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 04, 2018.

Cambridge geographer Dr. Richard Powell was interviewed by Radio Canada International about the recent announcement of a new British Arctice Defence Strategy.

GALLERY: Fermat's Last Theorem celebration, 1 October 2018

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 02, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Tuesday 2nd October 2018 - 12:30


On the afternoon of Monday 1 October 2018 the Isaac Newton Institute hosted the event "Fermat’s Last Theorem: A celebration 25 years on".

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of Sir Andrew Wiles famously announcing his proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem at the Institute, the event featured technical talks with speakers including Andrew Wiles himself (Oxford), John Coates (Cambridge) and Jack Thorne (Cambridge); a presentation to Andrew Wiles; and a wine reception for the gathered guests.

New Director of Teaching comes full circle

By dh473 from News. Published on Oct 01, 2018.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry

Dr Bill Nolan takes over as Director of Teaching today, as his predecessor, Dr James Keeler, becomes Head of Department.

Researchers' new method for synthesising molecules desirable in drug discovery

By rg580 from News. Published on Oct 01, 2018.

Image: Department of Chemistry

Researchers here have invented an effective and operationally straightforward process for producing a type of compounds – complex alkylamines – whose physical properties make them desirable in drug discovery programmes.

New paper: The interactive relationship between coastal erosion and flood risk

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 01, 2018.

A new article by CCRU's James Pollard, Professor Tom Spencer, and Dr Sue Brooks establishes that coastal flooding and erosion interact in complex ways that must be addressed for effective risk management.

Film as Method in the Geohumanities

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 01, 2018.

(9th- 10th October) PhD student Mathilda Rosengren, Prof Matthew Gandy, Prof Bill Adams and Prof Clive Oppenheimer are putting on a two day screening and workshop event that will show a diverse range of recent films about nature, landscape, and earth systems followed by a series of discussions and presentations. Documentary filmmaking has become an increasingly significant methodology in anthropology, geography and other disciplines as part of a growing interest but in what has been termed the 'geo-humanities'. Themes to be explored include narrative strategies and structures, the conceptual status of documentary verisimilitude, and the changing role of film in emerging cultures of nature in the Anthropocene. For enquiries and registration please contact Mathilda Rosengren (smnr2@cam.ac.uk)

New leadership for the Department of Materials Science

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 28, 2018.

The Department welcomes a new leadership team from 1st October 2018.  Professor Paul Midgley is stepping into the Head of Department role and will be ably supported by Professor Serena Best CBE and Professor James Elliott as Deputy Heads with responsibilities for Research and Teaching,...

Reefs in space and time: Recognising David Stoddart's contribution to coral reef science

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 28, 2018.

A new collection of papers on coral reef geology, geomorphology, biogeography and ecology, and the history of reef science has been published in the memory of David Ross Stoddart (1937-2014). David Stoddart was a member (undergraduate, Demonstrator, University Lecturer) of the Department of Geography between 1956 and 1988, before becoming Chair of Department and Professor of Geography, University of California at Berkeley. He was a graduate student of Alfred Steers, completing a Ph.D. on the Belize Barrier Reef in 1964. The collection was the outcome of the opening session of 13th International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS) in Honolulu, Hawai'i in June 2016 and includes contributions from 4 reef scientists - Colin Woodroffe, Tom Spencer, Sarah Hamylton and Annelise Hagan – all products of graduate training in Physical Geography at Cambridge.

Biodiversity conservation initiatives have unfulfilled potential to support the UN Sustainable Development Goals

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 27, 2018.

This week, the United Nations General Assembly reconvenes in New York for its 73rd session, bringing together the international community to drive progress towards the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). An interdisciplinary team of researchers associated with the Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI) are asking what contributions biodiversity conservation organisations can make to the SDGs. The project, "Unusual Suspects", examines CCI organisations' own experiences of biodiversity conservation to consider where potential to deliver the SDGs might lie, and how this might be facilitated. Read the full article.

Cambridge Geographer in Green Bay news

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 26, 2018.

Third year student George Boughton's dissertation research on the Green Bay Packers has earned him a feature in the local newspaper Green Bay News. George's dissertation will explore how sports can build community identity and a sense of belonging and has involved conducting interviews with a wide range of groups within the Green Bay area.

Showcasing our students' work

By rg580 from News. Published on Sep 25, 2018.

Image courtesy of the Department of Chemistry

This week is Chemistry Showcase Week when, to enhance their science communication skills, our postgraduate students must present their research to all of us.

Scientists reveal ground-breaking plan to target the cause of Alzheimer’s disease

By rg580 from News. Published on Sep 25, 2018.

Conceptual image showing blurred brain with loss of neuronal networks. Image Credit: Kateryna Kon

In a breakthrough, researchers have developed a new way to target the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease.

Compass Sixth Form Essay Competition

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 25, 2018.

Compass, the magazine for Cambridge University Geographical Society (CUGS) is holding an essay competition for Sixth Form students. The essay competition is open to all Year 12 and 13 students and the deadline for entries is September 30th. This is a great opportunity for students to explore an issue in greater depth away from the school syllabus. The winning entry will be published in the next issue in November and the top entries will be featured on the Compass website.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell appointed Academic Trustee of Royal Museums Greenwich

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 25, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of SPRI, who has been appointed by the Prime Minister as an Academic Trustee to Royal Museums Greenwich for the next four years.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell appointed Academic Trustee of Royal Museums Greenwich

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 25, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of SPRI, who has been appointed by the Prime Minister as an Academic Trustee to Royal Museums Greenwich for the next four years.

Cambridge Dendrochronology on BBC Breakfast

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 24, 2018.

The work of Professor Ulf Buntgen and the Dendrochronology lab was featured this morning on BBC Breakfast, exploring the lab's analyses of ancient tree trunks found at the bottom of Scottish Lochs.

Dr Robert Hoye awarded Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowship

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 21, 2018.

Dr Robert Hoye has been awarded a prestigious Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowship to advance his research career. These Fellowships provide early-career researchers with five years’ worth of funding and mentorship, enabling them to develop independent careers in research and...

Tree Rings and Radiocarbon

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 20, 2018.

Professor Ulf Büntgen is presenting a talk, Tree Rings and Radiocarbon, at the AMS Beyond 2020 Symposium at ETH in Zurich on Friday 21 September. The AMS Symposium presentations will be livestreamed tomorrow morning, with Professor Büntgen presenting at 11.45 (time local to Zurich).

Prof Judith Driscoll becomes Royal Academy of Engineering Fellow

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 18, 2018.

We are very pleased to announce that Prof Judith Driscoll is one of the 50 new fellows elected to the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Coastal management could prevent rising sea levels causing large scale loss of coastal wetlands

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 18, 2018.

A new study, by a team of researchers led by members of the Department's Cambridge Coastal Research Unit, finds that coastal management could prevent rising sea levels causing large-scale loss of coastal wetlands. Previous studies have predicted catastrophic coastal wetland loss as sea levels rise. However, this new research shows that the global area of coastal wetland could increase if coasts are managed so that they have alternative spaces to grow: areas where sediment could build up, uninhibited by built infrastructure such as sea walls and cities, and where wetland plants could develop. Coastal wetlands could then expand inland in response to sea level rise. The research was led by Dr Mark Schuerch, former postdoctoral research fellow at CCRU (now University of Lincoln) with the CCRU Director Professor Tom Spencer and including Dr Ruth Reef (now University of Monash).

Professor Lars Hesselholt - Rothschild Lecture (8th October)

By ss917 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Sep 13, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Thursday 13th September 2018 - 12:45

We are delighted to announce that Professor Lars Hesselholt (Nagoya University), the Rothschild Distinguished Visiting Fellow for the HHH programme, will be giving the Rothschild Lecture on Monday 8 October at 4.00 pm at the Institute, followed by a wine reception.

More details about the lecture are available, here

Professor Martin Hairer - Rothschild Lecture date announced

By ss917 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Sep 13, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Thursday 13th September 2018 - 12:30

We are delighted to announce that Professor Martin Hairer (Imperial College, London), the Rothschild Distinguished Visiting Fellow for the SRQ programme, will be giving the Rothschild Lecture on Friday 28 September at 4.00 pm at the Institute, followed by a wine reception.

More details are available, here

 

INI and ICMS are currently seeking a new Chair of Correspondents

By Vincenzo from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Sep 07, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Friday 7th September 2018 - 10:45

The Isaac Newton Institute (INI) and International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS) seek to appoint a new Chair of Correspondents from 1st January 2019.

Charlotte Lemanski speaks at Speculative Infrastructures workshop, Sheffield

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 07, 2018.

Charlotte Lemanski discusses her work at the Speculative Infrastructures workshop, held at the University of Sheffield 6-7 September, sponsored by the Urban Geography journal. Discussing her recent research on infrastructural citizenship within the framework of 'displacement', she also explores the temporal nature of the displacement of expectations and hopes for South Africans awaiting public infrastructure.

New paper: Tree rings reveal globally coherent signature of cosmogenic radiocarbon events in 774 and 993 CE

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 06, 2018.

Based on the largest ever volunteer effort by the international tree-ring community, including 67 scholars from 57 institutes around the world, the global extent and seasonal timing of the rapid increase in atmospheric Carbon-14 concentrations from the two largest cosmogenic events in 774 and 993 CE is presented for the first time ever. The research team included the Department's Professor Ulf Büntgen, Professor Clive Oppenheimer, and Paul J. Krusic.

Sir David Attenborough joins a celebration of the Cambridge Masters in Conservation Leadership

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 04, 2018.

Sir David Attenborough was at the University last week to join an event celebrating the achievements of the alumni of the Masters in Conservation Leadership. The event brought together, for the first time, over 120 alumni from the first eight cohorts of the Masters in Conservation Leadership, along with many of the conservation researchers and practitioners based in Cambridge who contribute to the delivery of the Masters course. The event was designed to celebrate the Masters, and to strengthen the global network of alumni, who come from over 70 different countries, so that it helps them to achieve enhanced conservation impact. The course is based in the Department of Geography.

Metals mark magma for life

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Sep 03, 2018.

Gases erupted by volcanoes contain various volatile metal products. New research by Marie Edmonds and Emma Liu in Cambridge and Tamsin Mather in Oxford has discovered that different kinds of volcanoes have distinctive metal ‘signatures’, which reflect differences in how their magma forms.

How drones can save UK forests

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 31, 2018.

Dr Steve Boreham, Geographical Services Officer for the Department of Geography, explains how drones are changing data collection from different landscapes in his new article How Drones Can Save the UK's Forests, published by Geographical.

Historic building activity in Europe mirrors plague outbreaks and food prices

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 31, 2018.

With the help of almost 50,000 precisely dated pieces of construction timber, researchers, including the Department's Professor Ulf Büntgen, have for the first time reconstructed variations in the intensity of building activity in Europe from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century. A comparison of the building history with plague epidemic and food price data revealed that decreases in building activity coincided with larger plague outbreaks and higher food prices. The results have just been published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Ruth Massey and Charlotte Lemanski at Royal Geographical Society Conference

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 30, 2018.

Drs Ruth Massey and Charlotte Lemanski attended the Royal Georgaphical Society 2018 conference in Cardiff (28-31 August), and presented their current work in the 'Urban Energy Landscapes in the Global South' session. Ruth spoke about strategies to deliver energy innovation to low-income housing settlements. Using examples from fieldwork in Cape Town, South Africa, the presentation highlighted the ways in which partnerships and networks between key stakeholders (public, private, community) comprise a form of infrastructure in itself, but one that is frequently overlooked. As a consequence of ignoring the importance of building partnerships between those involved in devising, delivering and using energy interventions for low-income housing, the long-term sustainability of interventions is compromised. These findings comprises part of Charlotte Lemanski's British Academy Cities and Infrastructure Grant on Energy Innovation for low-income housing in India and South Africa.

New paper: The double crisis: in what sense a regional problem?

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 24, 2018.

A new paper from Dr Mia Gray, published in the journal Regional Studies, calls for regional studies scholars to explore new growth models to solve economic and environmental issues.

New paper: Sonic refugia: nature, noise abatement and landscape design in West Berlin

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Aug 23, 2018.

The Department's Dr Sandra Jasper has a new paper published in the Journal of Architecture, Sonic refugia: nature, noise abatement and landscape design in West Berlin. The paper explores how West Berlin landscape designers used planting to prevent noise pollution.

Ragnhild Dale wins Public Engagement with Research Award

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 02, 2018.

Congratulations to PhD student Ragnhild Dale (SPRI), who has been awarded a Vice Chancellor's Public Engagement with Research Award for her work in the "Trial of the Century" project, a mock trail of a lawsuit over Arctic oil.

Alan Baker memorial conference: 18 October 2018

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Aug 01, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Wednesday 1st August 2018 - 16:30

 

The Institute is pleased to announce that on 18 October 2018 it will be hosting a one day conference in memory of Alan Baker, and celebrating his mathematical legacy. An eminent number theorist, Fields Medal recipient and Fellow of Trinity College, Baker passed away in February of this year aged 78. Details of the conference can be found via the poster below.

Two Department postdocs selected as semi-finalists of the University's Postdoc Business Plan Competition

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Aug 01, 2018.

Paul Coxon and Tongtong Zhu have been selected as semi-finalists in the 2018 Postdoc Business Plan Competition, run by Cambridge Enterprise with the Entrepreneurial Postdocs of Cambridge (EPOC).  These postdocs and their projects now advance to the next phase of the competition along with 10...

Dr Cate Ducati wins an RMS Medal

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Aug 01, 2018.

We are really pleased to announce that Dr Cate Ducati has won the Royal Microscopical Society Medal for Innovation in Applied Microscopy for Engineering and Physical Sciences for her outstanding scientific achievements in applying microscopy in the fields of engineering and physical science....

Polar Encounters - SPRI's exhibition of polar art opens today in London

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 30, 2018.

Polar Encounters, an exhibition of 200 years of polar art featuring work from the SPRI art collection and by the Friends of SPRI artists in residence, is open at Bonhams in London. This free exhibition brings together European and Inuit artworks from the last two centuries to explore the Arctic, and eight of our recent artists in residence have their bold new works on show from both the Arctic and the Antarctic. The exhibition is open Monday-Friday, 10-4 at Bonhams, 101 New Bond Street, London from 30 July - 17 August.

Dr Owen Saxton receives the IOP Lord Rayleigh Medal and Prize

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jul 25, 2018.

Dr Owen Saxton, who has worked closely with many of members of the Electron Microscopy group over many years as a 'Senior Affiliate' of the Department, has been awarded the Lord Rayleigh Medal and Prize from the Institute of Physics.  This is to recognise his contributions to the Gerchberg-...

PhD student Morgan Seag working to improve diversity and inclusion in polar research

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 16, 2018.

PhD student Morgan Seag is working to improve diversity and inclusion in polar research. She was one of several Cambridge geographers attending POLAR2018 last month, a conference of 2500 researchers, science supporters, and policymakers working on the Arctic, Antarctic and global cryosphere.

Dr Richard Powell summoned as witness before Environmental Audit Committee

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 16, 2018.

In July 2018, Dr Richard Powell appeared as a witness before the UK Parliament's Environmental Audit Committee's inquiry into the Changing Arctic, to provide expertise in UK Arctic social sciences and humanities and advise on formation of UK Arctic research and policy.

The Changing Arctic?

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 11, 2018.

Geographer Richard Powell will appear today, 11 July 2018, as a witness before the Environmental Audit Committee's inquiry into the Changing Arctic. The inquiry is assessing the UK Government's Arctic policy, and examining whether the UK, as one of the Arctic's nearest neighbours, should be doing more to protect this vulnerable region. Richard will provide expertise in UK Arctic social sciences and humanities and advise on formation of UK Arctic research and policy.

A tribute to Professor Mila Nikolova (1962-2018)

By Vincenzo from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jun 28, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Thursday 28th June 2018 - 14:15

It is with great sadness that we report the passing away last week of Professor Mila Nikolova, Research Director at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and Microsoft Fellow, Simons Fellow, and long term participant (August to December 2017) on the recent INI programme on Variational Methods and Effective Algorithms for Imaging and Vision (VMV). Mila is known for her substantial contributions in optimisation, in particular the analysis of solutions to optimisation problems and application of optimisation techniques in image processing and inverse problems.

Dr Robert Hoye wins a RAEng Engineers Trust Young Engineer of the Year award

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 28, 2018.

Dr Robert Hoye is one of five young engineers who have had an outstanding impact in their respective fields early in their careers and received this prestigious award at the Royal Academy of Engineering Awards Dinner on Wednesday 27 June.

The RAEng Engineers Trust Young Engineer of the...

Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the past

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 25, 2018.

Selected intervals in the past that were as warm or warmer than today can help us understand what the Earth may be like under future global warming. A latest assessment of past warm periods, by an international team of 59 scientists from 17 nations including Cambridge Earth Sciences' Professor Eric Wolff, shows that in response to the warming ecosystems and climate zones will spatially shift and on millennial time scales ice sheets will substantially shrink.

Dr Thomas Bennett wins ISIS Science Impact Award 2018

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 19, 2018.

Dr Thomas Bennett has won the ISIS Science Impact Award for his work using neutrons to help reveal the structure of a melt-quenched metal-organic framework glass - the first example of the new hybrid glass family.

The ISIS Impact Awards are presented by the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source ...

Dating the emplacement of the Shap granite using zircon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 07, 2018.

G5a - the distinctive coarse-grained, pink granite exposed at Shap in Cumbria - has long been a favourite igneous hand specimen for Earth Sciences teaching in Cambridge. New research uses the age of zircon crystal formation to suggest a long gestation period in the mid-crust before its final emplacement 405 million years ago.

L'Oréal UNESCO For Women in Science award for Dr Emma Liu

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 04, 2018.

Congratulations to Dr Emma Liu, Leverhulme Research Fellow in Volcanology, who has been awarded a 2018 L’Oreal UNESCO For Women In Science fellowship to support her postdoctoral research.

Applying for Research Fellowships

By rg580 from News. Published on May 22, 2018.

Are you a current or prospective postdoc interested in applying for a research fellowship to be held here? If so, the next deadline for submitting an expression of interest is 31 December.  

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 17, 2018.

A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought.

Drs Ian Willis and Alison Banwell awarded Fellowships at the University of Colorado Boulder

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 16, 2018.

Ian Willis and Alison Banwell have been awarded, respectively, a 1-year sabbatical fellowship and a 2-year post-doctoral fellowship to undertake collaborative work with Waleed Abdalati and Michael Willis (no relation!) at the Co-operative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and Ted Scambos at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. They will advance their current work investigating the surface hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the surface hydrology and stability of Antarctic ice shelves.

Research Assistant/Associate in Remote Sensing of Forests

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 01, 2018.

Applications are invited for a Research Assistant/ Research Associate to work under the direction of Dr Gareth Rees, for a British Council funded research project mapping the distribution and spatial characteristics of forests in northern Russia, using remote sensing techniques. The closing date for applications is 25th May 2018.

Major research project planned into collapse of the Thwaites Glacier

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 30, 2018.

Dr Poul Christoffersen will co-lead one of eight projects in a new joint UK-US research programme, that is one of the most detailed and extensive examinations of a massive Antarctic glacier ever undertaken. Dr Christoffersen's project, Thwaites Interdisciplinary Margin Evolution (TIME), will investigate how the margins of the Thwaites Glacier drainage basin will evolve and influence ice flow over the coming decades.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 26, 2018.

Congratulations to Professor Julian Dowdeswell on being elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales. Fellows to the Society are elected in recognition of academic excellence.

Cambridge Earth Sciences once again top amongst UK geology departments in the Complete University Guide

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 25, 2018.

The Department is delighted to be placed first amongst UK geology departments once again.

1000 km down: seismologists probe the mid-mantle

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 24, 2018.

Many questions remain unanswered about the mid-mantle, 600 to 1200 km below Earth’s surface. Does this layer decouple convection between the upper and lower mantle? How are processes here linked to plate tectonics and volcanism? Cambridge Earth Scientists are using seismic constraints to determine the compositional heterogeneity in the mid-mantle. They hope to identify processes which could obstruct or divert convection 1000 km down.

Brachiopods prove tougher than previously thought

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 18, 2018.

A remarkable 120-year record of resilience to environmental change in the world’s oceans has been uncovered within a group of marine organisms called brachiopods. Although they are not well known today, brachiopods have had considerable importance in the evolution of seabed life.

Subglacial lakes discovered under Devon Island ice cap

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 18, 2018.

A new study of the Devon Island ice cap, led by a team from the University of Alberta, has discovered two subglacial bodies of water. These are the first subglacial lakes to be observed in the Canadian Arctic, and are estimated to cover areas of five and eight square kilometres respectively. The findings, co-authored by Director of The Scott Polar Research Institute Professor Julian Dowdeswell, have been published in Science Advances

Hot, warm or cold?: new insight into how columnar jointing forms

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 13, 2018.

A new study by researchers at the University of Liverpool, with contributions from Cambridge Earth Sciences PhD student Fiona Iddon, has identified the temperature at which cooling magma cracks to form geometric columns such as those found at the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland.

Two billion year old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphere

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 12, 2018.

A two billion year old chunk of sea salt provides new evidence for the transformation of Earth's atmosphere into an oxygenated environment capable of supporting life as we know it.

Scientific expedition to the Larsen C Ice Shelf

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 11, 2018.

A planned scientific expedition to the Antarctic to visit and study the Larsen C Ice Shelf - and explore the area where Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship was last seen - will be led by Professor Julian Dowdeswell next year. Professor Dowdeswell, Director of the Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, will lead the international Weddell Sea Expedition 2019 next spring. It will bring together leading researchers from the Institute as well as the Nekton Foundation, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, the University of Cape Town and the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme this morning, Professor Dowdeswell explained that the expedition will survey the underside of the iceshelf using underwater submersibles, to ascertain whether conditions leading to the calving of an enormous iceberg from Larsen C in 2017 means that the shelf may collapse: "Iceshelves butress the interior of the Antarctic icesheet, they effectively act to hold back the ice that flows from the interior of the Antarctic to the edge. They are in some senses vulnerable because not only can they lose mass by the production of icebergs at their edge but also because they're floating, beneath they have ocean water flowing in and that ocean water can lead to meltrates at the base of a number of metres per year and this is what's been happening to some areas of Antarctica." Further coverage also features on BBC News, Telegraph and Independent websites.

Department of Geography at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 09, 2018.

Several staff, postdocs, PhD students and research associates within the Department of Geography and Scott Polar Research Institute will be showcasing their research at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) 8-13 April 2018, the largest geosciences meeting in Europe. Details of the presentations and our research groups are available.

Inuit Visions of the Polar World

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 05, 2018.

Dr Michael Bravo will be running an interactive talk, Inuit Visions of the Polar World, at the Heong Gallery, Downing College. The talk will take place at 6pm, on Thursday 10 May 2018. Please register if you would like to attend.

Observing deep carbon with an Icelandic volcano

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2018.

An important new chemical dataset from the basalt lavas of the Icelandic Borgarhraun volcano is helping Cambridge Earth Scientists John Maclennan and Dan McKenzie with colleagues from the US and Iceland estimate the carbon dioxide content of Earth’s mantle. Borgarhraun is one of the few places in the world from where it is possible to probe the mantle CO2. This new data, published in the latest issue of Geology will improve understanding of the link between volcanism and long-term climate change.

ERC Arctic Cultures Post-docs

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 22, 2018.

Dr. Richard Powell is recruiting FOUR three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates (PDRAs) to work on the ERC Consolidator Grant project, ARCTIC CULT (Arctic Cultures: Sites of Collection in the Formation of the European and American Northlands) to start in October 2018. Further details are available online. The closing date is 30th April 2018.

Abel Prize: Robert P. Langlands wins 2018 award for "completely new way of thinking about mathematics"

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Mar 20, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Tuesday 20th March 2018 - 12:45

 

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has awarded the 2018 Abel Prize to Robert P. Langlands (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton) “for his visionary program connecting representation theory to number theory”.  

(press release follows)

Inuit Trails

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 16, 2018.

Dr Michael Bravo's Pan Inuit Trails project, which maps part of the extensive trail network used for Inuit travel across the North American continent, is featured in the Guardian article 'Counter-mapping: cartography that lets the powerless speak'. You can find out more about the project at paninuittrails.org.

Chain reaction of fast-draining lakes poses new risk for Greenland ice sheet

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 15, 2018.

A growing network of lakes on the Greenland ice sheet has been found to drain in a chain reaction that speeds up the flow of the ice sheet, threatening its stability. Researchers from the SPRI and others across the UK, Norway, US and Sweden have used a combination of 3D computer modelling and real-world observations to show the previously unknown, yet profound dynamic consequences tied to a growing number of lakes forming on the Greenland ice sheet.

Preliminary works begin on the Cavendish 3 site

By from News. Published on Mar 14, 2018.

As part of the verification of technical aspects of the design of Cavendish III, two large concrete slabs have this week been cast on the site of the new building. The area depicted will ultimately form the base of the cycle storage under the raised plaza.

New paper: Controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in West Greenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 08, 2018.

A team of researchers from the Scott Polar Research Institute have published a new paper investigating the causes of rapid lake-drainage events on the Greenland Ice Sheet. For this, the research team assembled a variety of different remotely sensed datasets to derive a series of controls that might explain why some lakes drain rapidly and others do not. However, among the controls investigated, they were unable to find any statistically significant drivers of the lake-drainage process. The team includes PhD student Andrew Williamson, Dr Ian Willis, Dr Neil Arnold and Dr Alison Banwell.

Prof Val Gibson "Equality Champion"

By from News. Published on Mar 07, 2018.

Piers Vitebsky elected Honorary Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the Sakha Republic

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 06, 2018.

Piers Vitebsky, Assistant Director of Research (Retired) at the Scott Polar Research Institute, has been elected an Honorary Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia.

Evolution of land plants transformed sedimentation on Earth

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 01, 2018.

The vegetation of our planet irrevocably changed surface processes on Earth. New research suggests the evolution of land plants in the Ordovician caused an increase in the volume of mud preserved on the continents. This marked a change in global sedimentation, with implications for the study of sedimentary processes on our planet and beyond.

SPRI MPhil Scholarships

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Mar 01, 2018.

The deadline for the Debenham Scholarship and the Scott Polar Scholarship is 31 March 2018. Each scholarship is worth £7,614 (2018-19 rate) and will be awarded to the best applicant for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies who is not in receipt of another University award. By applying for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies, you will automatically be entered into the competition for these awards, as long as your application is received by the deadline.

Investigating the warm climate stability of the West Antarctic ice sheet

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Recent modelling studies predict that anthropogenic warming could lead to the loss of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the next few centuries, and a big rise in sea level.

AHRC Doctoral studentship: Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956-present

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded studentship at the University of Cambridge, Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) and Royal Society. The PhD studentship is one of six awards being made by the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership with the Science Museums and Archives Consortium. The project is full-time, funded for three years and begins in October 2018. It will be supervised by Dr Richard Powell (Scott Polar Research Institute and Department of Geography, University of Cambridge), Dr Catherine Souch (RGS-IBG) and Keith Moore (Royal Society), with technical training support from Charlotte Connelly (Polar Museum, Cambridge).

Blue mussel shape is a powerful indicator of environmental change

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 12, 2018.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge and British Antarctic Survey have developed a new method to identify natural patterns of shell shape variation in common blue mussels.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell awarded 2018 Lyell Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 02, 2018.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, has been awarded the 2018 Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London for significant contributions to the science through a substantial body of work. The Lyell Medal has been awarded since 1876 and is the Society's highest award for 'soft rock' geology. It was established with a gift from the distinguished 19th Century scientist Charles Lyell who wrote the 'Principles of Geology'.

CANCELLED: Studying Arctic Fields

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 31, 2018.

The Launch for Richard Powell's new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Culturers, Practices, and Environmental Sciences will be held at SPRI at 4.30 p.m., Monday 26 February 2018. This event is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen's University Press. Please RSVP Jenny Dunstall to attend.

Pteropods tougher than thought

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 29, 2018.

Elegant little sea butterflies, more technically known as pteropods, are important members of the marine ecosystem because they are so abundant and are a food source for other marine organisms, especially whales.

RAS Gold Medal for Professor Robert White

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 22, 2018.

Congratulations to Robert (Bob) White, Professor of Geophysics and Fellow of St Edmund’s College, who has been awarded the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal for a lifetime of distinguished achievement in solid Earth geophysics.

The beginnings of communal life – 565 million years ago

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 18, 2018.

Ancient rock strata exposed within the World Heritage Site of Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland, record one of Life's very first communities of seabed dwelling macro-organisms. Known as the Ediacaran biota, it is around 565 million years old.

Prof Bernard Silverman FRS: longtime INI supporter knighted in New Year's Honours

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jan 02, 2018.

Publication Date: 
Tuesday 2nd January 2018 - 16:15

 

The Institute would like to extend its warmest congratulations to Professor Bernard Silverman - a long-time friend and supporter of INI - who has been knighted in the New Year's Honours list 2018.

Going underground: Cambridge digs into the history of geology with landmark exhibition

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

A box full of diamonds, volcanic rock from Mount Vesuvius, and the geology guide that Darwin packed for his epic voyage on the Beagle are on display at the Cambridge University Library as part of the first major exhibition to celebrate geological map-making.

Interview: "Form in Art" contributing artist Manoel Veiga

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Dec 07, 2017.

Publication Date: 
Thursday 7th December 2017 - 15:00

 

Since 20 November 2017, INI has played host to the art exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form". Run concurrently with the "Growth form and self-organisation" programme, it has aimed to "explore the relationship between form, as understood mathematically, and art" and features works from 10 leading contemporary artists.

At the exhibition's launch event, and shortly before he returned to his native Sao Paulo, we interviewed one of the contributing artists: Manoel Veiga.

 

Enhancing the growth of plants on inhospitable land using a biological fertiliser

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

A simple mixture of organic waste, such as chicken manure and zeolite, a porous volcanic mineral, has been developed into a powerful bio-fertiliser which can also reclaim semi-arid and contaminated land.

Collaborating on carbon capture and storage

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

Cambridge Earth Sciences is part of a global project researching new sites for carbon capture and storage (CCS), supported by leading multinational minerals and energy company BHP.

Award winning researchers in Earth Sciences

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Congratulations to our researchers who have recently won awards.

Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

Dr Elizabeth Harper has been appointed Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum following the retirement of Dr Ken McNamara.

100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

To mark 100 years since John E Marr became Woodwardian Professor, on 30 October 1917, a selection of documents have been digitised and will be available to view on the Sedgwick Museum website from 30 October.

Plate Tectonics at 50

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 06, 2017.

The Geological Society of London has launched its new archive of Emeritus Professor Dan McKenzie’s work.

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 31, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

We were very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 13, 2017.

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 10, 2017.

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.