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Enhancing the growth of plants on inhospitable land using a biological fertiliser

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

A simple mixture of organic waste, such as chicken manure and zeolite, a porous volcanic mineral, has been developed into a powerful bio-fertiliser which can also reclaim semi-arid and contaminated land.

Inverse Problems Network meeting, 23-24 November 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

Monday 20th November 2017 - 14:45

 

INI is pleased to welcome the EPSRC-funded Inverse Problems Network, which will hold a two day meeting at the Institute on 23-24 November. 

The meeting will commence with a 12.00 lunch held in the common room of the maths campus' nearby Pavilion F. The talks, meanwhile, will be held in INI's Seminar Room 1. 

There is no need to register, and full details of the event can be found via the following link: http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/invprob2/showtt.php

 

 

 

 

CCRU down under

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Researchers from the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit have contributed to a successful Australian Research Council Discovery Project award led by Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. This prestigious award (A$ 324k) will enable knowledge transfer and exchange between the two island nations to reduce vulnerability to sea level rise. The low elevation coastal zone contains 13% of the Australian population and is subject to intensive agriculture and urbanisation. Accelerating sea level rise is thus a major societal concern and its impacts on shorelines must be accurately determined. This Australian-UK collaboration aims to improve Australia's capacity to predict changing shoreline position with sea level rise, better understand the role of vegetation in foreshore stabilisation and identify under what conditions the shoreline might suddenly shift landwards.

Rising Tides bring innovation prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Victoria Herrmann, a PhD student at the Scott Polar Research Institute and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, has won a prestigious US social entrepreneurship prize for a research project on US towns and cities at risk of partial submersion due to climate change. Victoria's was one of 10 projects to scoop the JM Kaplan Fund Innovation Prize. Her winning Rising Tides project will create a new online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities.

UK premiere for Natura Urbana - The Brachen of Berlin

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Natura Urbana – the Brachen of Berlin (72 mins) written and directed by Matthew Gandy and Sandra Jasper will have its UK premiere at the London International Documentary Festival on Saturday 25 November 2018. The LIDF is London's oldest and largest documentary festival. The screening will be at 11:00, at The Archivist, N1 5ET. Individual tickets for this screening must be purchased in advance online. In Natura Urbana the changing vegetation of Berlin serves as a parallel history to war-time destruction, geo-political division, and the newest phase of urban transformation. Natura Urbana takes us on a unique journey through Berlin ranging from the botanical microcosm of cracked paving stones to elaborate attempts to map the entire city in terms of its distinctive ecological zones. View the trailer online.

Rising Tides bring innovation prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Victoria Herrmann, a PhD student at the Scott Polar Research Institute and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, has won a prestigious US social entrepreneurship prize for a research project on US towns and cities at risk of partial submersion due to climate change. Victoria's was one of 10 projects to scoop the JM Kaplan Fund Innovation Prize. Her winning Rising Tides project will create a new online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities.

Jim Charles, 1926 – 2017

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Nov 16, 2017.

We are deeply saddened to announce that Dr Jim Charles, Emeritus Reader in Metallurgy, died peacefully in Cambridge on 13 November 2017, aged 91.

Jim is remembered fondly in his obituary published online by St. John's College ...

"More Tales of our Forefathers" - a talk by Professor Barry Simon, 13 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 16:15


"More Tales of our Forefathers"
Professor Barry Simon 
13 December 2017

Following on from his hugely popular 2015 talk "Tales of our Forefathers", Caltech's Professor Barry Simon will return to INI this December with more biographical insight, intrigue and interest from the lives of some of the most influential figures in mathematics. 

Professor Vendruscolo's distinguished work honoured

By rg580 from News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Courtesy University of Cambridge

For his "distinguished work", Professor Michele Vendruscolo has received the Giuseppe Occhialini Medal and Prize, awarded jointly by the Institute of Physics and the Italian Physical Society.

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium - 12 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 12:45

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium

New paper on inland advance of supraglacial lakes in Greenland under climatic warming

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 13, 2017.

A new article by recently graduated undergraduate student Laura Gledhill (Downing College) and Scott Polar Research Institute PhD student Andrew Williamson explores the inland advance of supraglacial lakes in a north-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet under recent climatic warming. The paper, published recently in the Annals of Glaciology, is based on Laura's undergraduate dissertation, which Andrew supervised. Many congratulations to them both!

Smuts Memorial Lecture Series 2017: AbdouMaliq Simone

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 13, 2017.

Former Distinguished International Visitor in the Department, AbdouMaliq Simone, will be giving the first set in the Smuts Memorial Lecture Series, entitled The Uninhabitable: Afterlives of the Urban South. The three lectures will be held in the Large Lecture Theatre in Geography at 5.15 pm on 7th, 9th and 13th November. Drawing on examples from a number of cities, the lectures focus on how we should explain the lives and living conditions of the poor in the Global South. In a highly imaginative move, Professor Simon argues that, in the spaces of the 'uninhabitable', the poor learn to develop forms of agency, community and and dignity that need recognition, and come with important lessons for how precarity worldwide may need to be managed in the future. The lectures cover material and ideas that are central to papers in the Department on the urban, post-colonial, and Global South. It is worth attending all three lectures, as the second two delve in to specific examples from around the world. You can book a ticket for each of the three lectures online.

New paper on inland advance of supraglacial lakes in Greenland under climatic warming

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 13, 2017.

A new article by recently graduated undergraduate student Laura Gledhill (Downing College) and Scott Polar Research Institute PhD student Andrew Williamson explores the inland advance of supraglacial lakes in a north-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet under recent climatic warming. The paper, published recently in the Annals of Glaciology, is based on Laura's undergraduate dissertation, which Andrew supervised. Many congratulations to them both!

Cambridge geographer wins historical geography undergraduate dissertation prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 10, 2017.

Many congratulations to Anna Lawrence (Sidney Sussex) for the award of the RGS-IBG Historical Geography Research Group undergraduate dissertation prize. Anna's dissertation was entitled Morals and Mignonette. Or, the Use of Flowers in the Moral Regulation of Women, Children, and the Working Classes in Late-Victorian London. The research group's assessors reported that "This is a thoughtful and theoretically ambitious study of an original topic: the role of flowers in late-Victorian moral regulation. It is beautifully written and convincingly argued with some excellent formulations. It covers a wide range of primary and secondary literature and displays an excellent understanding of the period and question." Anna was also invited to present at the recent Practising Historical Geography undergraduate/postgraduate conference in Manchester. Anna is currently an MPhil student in the Department, funded by the AHRC. Well done to her!

"Form in Art: Art of Form" - an INI exhibition, November-December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 09, 2017.

Thursday 9th November 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to announce that this autumn we will be hosting the public exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form".

Périgord black truffle cultivated in the UK for the first time

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 06, 2017.

The Mediterranean black truffle, one of the world's most expensive ingredients, has been successfully cultivated in the UK, as climate change threatens its native habitat. The black truffle is one of the most expensive delicacies in the world, worth as much as £1,700 per kilogram. Black truffles are prized for their intense flavour and aroma, but they are difficult and time-consuming to grow and harvest, and are normally confined to regions with a Mediterranean climate. The results of the programme, which involved Professor Ulf Büntgen of the Department, and reported in the journal Climate Research, suggest that truffle cultivation may be possible in many parts of the UK.

APEX-II Program has won the first "Newton Prize"

By from News. Published on Nov 03, 2017.

Department welcomes prospective postgraduates

By dh473 from News. Published on Nov 02, 2017.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry Photography

Around 100 potential postgraduate students attended the department’s Graduate Students Admissions day in October.

Physical Geography / Environmental Science PhD opportunities

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Nov 01, 2017.

The list of PhD topics we would like to pursue with interested students has just been launched. The link gives further details. The funding deadline is 4th January 2018, for an October 2018 start. Do get in touch with a prospective supervisor who will help with your application as soon as possible.

Physical Geography / Environmental Science PhD opportunities

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 01, 2017.

The list of PhD topics we would like to pursue with interested students has just been launched. The link gives further details. The funding deadline is 4th January 2018, for an October 2018 start. Do get in touch with a prospective supervisor who will help with your application as soon as possible.

‘Monster’ planet discovery challenges formation theory

By from News. Published on Oct 31, 2017.

Workshop: Political Geology: Active Stratigraphies and the Making of Life

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 31, 2017.

November 17th 2017 What and where is the geos in geopolitics? This workshop will consider the evolution of ideas around the geos, its politics, scientific histories, and practices. The goal is to bring scholars from a diversity of fields and disciplines together to rethink the relationship between politics and geology and the agency of the geos in shaping and transforming politics. Presentations will focus on the politics of geophysical scientific practices; counter-histories of geological science in the West; power, erosion and soil; culture and volatile geologies; the politics of deep-futures in the present; subsurface depth, hidden-volumes, mediation; amodern geological imaginaries.

Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day: 3 November

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 30, 2017.

The Department will welcome prospective students for its MPhil and PhD students as part of the University of Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day on Friday 3 November. Come along to our exhibition stand in the University Centre from 12-4pm or come to the Department 2-3pm to meet current students and tour the facilities and from 3-4pm to hear a talk by Dr Emma Mawdsley on MPhil and PhD study. For those interested in Polar Studies, the Scott Polar Research Institute will be open from 2-4pm.

Department of Geography Postgraduate open day 3rd November

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 27, 2017.

Students and staff will be available to talk about life as a Graduate in the Department of Geography and ongoing Human and Physical Geography study and research. Venue: The Library - Department of Geography, Downing Place, CB2 3EN, 2-4pm The Scott Polar Research Institute will be open for visits. MPhil and PhD students will be available to talk about life in the department and SPRI Course Director will be available to chat to potential students. Venue: Main Reception, Scott Polar Research Institute, Lensfield Road, CB2 1ER 2-4pm There will also be a Geography Admissions Talk at 3pm, 3 November, Seminar Room, Department of Geography, CB2 3EN. Speakers will be Dr Emma Mawdsley "Moving on to an MPhil and PhD" and Professor Christine Lane – "Talking and answering questions on Physical Geography Research at Cambridge."

Department of Geography Postgraduate open day 3rd November

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 27, 2017.

Students and staff will be available to talk about life as a Graduate in the Department of Geography and ongoing Human and Physical Geography study and research. Venue: The Library - Department of Geography, Downing Place, CB2 3EN, 2-4pm The Scott Polar Research Institute will be open for visits. MPhil and PhD students will be available to talk about life in the department and SPRI Course Director will be available to chat to potential students. Venue: Main Reception, Scott Polar Research Institute, Lensfield Road, CB2 1ER 2-4pm There will also be a Geography Admissions Talk at 3pm, 3 November, Seminar Room, Department of Geography, CB2 3EN. Speakers will be Dr Emma Mawdsley "Moving on to an MPhil and PhD" and Professor Christine Lane – "Talking and answering questions on Physical Geography Research at Cambridge."

Collaborating on carbon capture and storage

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

Cambridge Earth Sciences is part of a global project researching new sites for carbon capture and storage (CCS), supported by leading multinational minerals and energy company BHP.

New paper in Nature - Seafloor ploughmarks left by icebergs record rapid West Antarctic ice retreat

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

In a new study published in Nature, Matt Wise and Julian Dowdeswell from Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, together with scientists from the British Antarctic Survey and Stockholm University investigate imagery of the seafloor of Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica. Identifying thousands of ploughmarks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, they show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as its margins balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable. Today, as the global climate continues to warm, rapid and sustained retreat may be close to happening again, and could trigger runaway ice retreat into the interior of the continent, which in turn would cause sea levels to rise even faster than currently projected.

New paper in Nature - Seafloor ploughmarks left by icebergs record rapid West Antarctic ice retreat

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

In a new study published in Nature, Matt Wise and Julian Dowdeswell from Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, together with scientists from the British Antarctic Survey and Stockholm University investigate imagery of the seafloor of Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica. Identifying thousands of ploughmarks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, they show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as its margins balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable. Today, as the global climate continues to warm, rapid and sustained retreat may be close to happening again, and could trigger runaway ice retreat into the interior of the continent, which in turn would cause sea levels to rise even faster than currently projected.

Three-year collaboration to predict Black Swans in medicine

By dh473 from News. Published on Oct 23, 2017.

A 'black swan' is the toxic effect of a compound which could have been predicted in hindsight

The first project of the Cambridge Alliance on Medicines Safety will be a three-year collaboration to predict the safety of current and future medicines.

New exhibit explores recent Greenland fieldwork

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 23, 2017.

The Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Institute is currently hosting a temporary exhibition 'Uummannaq: 100 years of exploration in Greenland' featuring fieldwork undertaken by Geography researchers over the summer. Led by Dr Poul Christoffersen the exhibition includes research undertaken by PhD students Samuel Cook and Tom Chudley. Samuel used a terrestrial radar interferometer to produce a unique record of iceberg calving from which he can calibrate a numerical model. While Tom used an Unmanned Aircraft System ('drone') to produce imagery of the calving ice front and the glacier in ultra high spatial resolution.

New exhibit explores recent Greenland fieldwork

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 23, 2017.

The Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Institute is currently hosting a temporary exhibition 'Uummannaq: 100 years of exploration in Greenland' featuring fieldwork undertaken by Geography researchers over the summer. Led by Dr Poul Christoffersen the exhibition includes research undertaken by PhD students Samuel Cook and Tom Chudley. Samuel used a terrestrial radar interferometer to produce a unique record of iceberg calving from which he can calibrate a numerical model. While Tom used an Unmanned Aircraft System ('drone') to produce imagery of the calving ice front and the glacier in ultra high spatial resolution.

The future of elections in Mostar at the Council of Europe

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 20, 2017.

On Thursday 19th October Dr. Alex Jeffrey, Reader in Human Geography, gave a speech at the Council of Europe, Strasbourg, at the 33rd Session of the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities in a debate about the future of elections in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Dr. Jeffrey focused on the potential for international agencies to break the political deadlock in Mostar, a town that has not held local elections since 2008. Reflecting on the various ways in international agencies can exert influence, the speech focused on the reform needed to Bosnian election law while emphasising the increased support required local civil society activists. The talk ended by reflecting on the changing geopolitical position of Bosnia and the wider Western Balkans as the significance of European agencies is confronted by rising Russian influence.

Who embodies the state? Indigenous women perform the state differently in Yucatan, Mexico

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 20, 2017.

Former PhD student at the Department of Geography, Laura Loyola-Hernandez has shown how rural Indigenous women in the Yucatan, Mexico, come into office as mayors to embody the state in more inclusive ways. Although Indigenous women were historically seen as 'out of place' in public office, the female mayors today use a variety of practices to make municipal offices and activities more inclusive of the rural, Indigenous and female citizens in their districts. The paper, in Political Geography (2017), shows that although exclusionary practices and attitudes influence wider urban and regional politics, "Indigenous female mayors have to some extent unsettled hierarchical gender, racial and ethnic power relations" (Loyola-Hernandez 2017: 56). Loyola-Hernandez, L. 2017 The porous state: Female mayors performing the state in Yucatecan Maya municipalities. Political Geography 62: 48-57. Loyola-Hernandez's work is part of research into how intersectional hierarchies shape the geographies of citizenship, citizenship and politics throughout Latin America, led by Sarah A. Radcliffe.

CUGS to reunite alumni

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 20, 2017.

Cambridge University Geographical Society is holding its first alumni dinner of the 21st century on Saturday 18 November 2017 at Christ's College. A champagne reception will be followed by a three-course banquet. Spaces are limited- so please RSVP at your earliest convenience.

Printable poster of INI Programmes & Workshops 2018

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

Thursday 19th October 2017 - 12:30

 

Throughout 2018 the Isaac Newton Institute will be hosting a total of four programmes and 17 workshops.

For ease of reference, we have produced the below poster showing the year's schedule along with basic details of the key events.

If you would like to download, share or print the poster, please click here to access the PDF.

Materials Science Postgraduate Open Day - 3rd November

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

Interested in postgraduate study?  Come to the Department on Friday 3 November to hear about our research opportunities and taught courses, meet the academic staff, and have a guided tour with current students. All prospective students welcome.  Regular bus service from the centre of town to the...

Departmental Seminars start today!

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

This year's series of Departmental Seminars start today (19th October 2017) with Professor Christine Lane and Professor Ulf Buentgen exploring 'Climate and History'. Christine Lane will present on 'Timing is everything. Using tephra to explore past climate and environmental change' and Ulf Buentgen on 'A tree-ring perspective on climate and history'. The seminar will take place in the Small Lecture Theatre at 3.30pm. Later in the term we will be hosting talks from Joe Smith (Open University), Richard Streeter (St Andrews) and Richard Sennett (LSE).

Printable poster of UNQ programme schedule

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Wednesday 18th October 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to be hosting the UNQ programme from January to June 2018. This collaboration of uncertainty quantification researchers comprises four main workshops, for which applications are currently open.

If you would like to download, print or share a poster of the programme's schedule (pictured below) then please click here to access the PDF.

Award winning researchers in Earth Sciences

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Congratulations to our researchers who have recently won awards.

Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

Dr Elizabeth Harper has been appointed Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum following the retirement of Dr Ken McNamara.

100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

To mark 100 years since John E Marr became Woodwardian Professor, on 30 October 1917, a selection of documents have been digitised and will be available to view on the Sedgwick Museum website from 30 October.

Cavendish III : A new era for physics at Cambridge

By from News. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

PANI, PAHAR Waters of the Himalayas

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 16, 2017.

This collaborative research project explores the changing landscapes and escalating water crises of the Indian Himalayas. On Tuesday the 17 October a photography exhibition will open to the public as part of the University of Cambridge Festival of Ideas and India Unboxed program. The exhibition combines academic research led by Professor Bhaskar Vira and Dr Eszter Kovacs at the Department of Geography (with collaborators in India and Nepal) with contemporary imagery by photojournalist Toby Smith and curated archival prints from the University Library and Centre for South Asian Studies. On Friday the 27 October there will also be an opportunity to join Toby Smith, Prof Bhaskar Vira and Dr Eszter Kovacs to discuss stories, processes and research behind this fascinating project: 6pm, St John's Divinity School.

Cambridge Geography at the Festival of Ideas

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 12, 2017.

Cambridge Geographers are involved in a number of events as part of this year's Festival of Ideas on the theme of 'Truth'. Dr David Nally is taking part in: 'GM Food: what's the problem?' on Tuesday 17 October Professor Mike Hulme will be exploring: 'Climate Change: the Truth' on Thursday 19 October While the Polar Museum is holding a Living in the Arctic Family Day (21 October) and a screening of the 1982 horror 'The Thing' (24 October).

Anja Schmidt wins EGU Award

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 10, 2017.

Congratulations to Department lecturer Dr Anja Schmidt who has been awarded an Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists by the European Geosciences Union.

Plate Tectonics at 50

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 06, 2017.

The Geological Society of London has launched its new archive of Emeritus Professor Dan McKenzie’s work.

Tributes to Fields Medallist Vladimir Voevodsky (1966-2017)

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 04, 2017.

Wednesday 4th October 2017 - 11:45

(photo: Andrea Kane)

The Isaac Newton Institute was this week deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Fields Medallist Vladimir Voevodsky at the age of 51.

Criminalization of abortion in Ecuador

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 04, 2017.

Sofia Zaragocin, a former PhD student at the Department of Geography and now Visiting Assistant Professor and Researcher, at the Department of Sociology and Gender, at FLACSO-Ecuador, has produced a map of the criminalisation of abortion in Ecuador. Comparing data from the period 2013-14 and 2015-June 2017, she and a team of geographers have documented a significant rise in the number of women facing criminal charges for abortion which remains illegal in the country. Research work in Ecuador continues in the Department with Professor Sarah A. Radcliffe's ongoing research into the socio-spatial consequences of major policy reforms undertaken in the past decade, resulting from the re-writing of the constitution in 2008.

What is the future of the UK countryside post Brexit?

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 04, 2017.

The University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute, led by Director Prof Bhaskar Vira, has convened a new online discussion platform on the future of the UK countryside post Brexit. The site includes contributes from a number of key thinkers in the area, and is introduced by Cambridge Geographer Hannah Wynton.

Learning from postneoliberalisms

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Oct 01, 2017.

Professor of Latin American Geography Sarah A. Radcliffe and co-authors have published a new paper in Progress in Human Geography entitled 'Learning from postneoliberalisms'. The paper draws on experiments in South America and South Africa to incorporate social movement agendas for change into state policy and action. Sarah Radcliffe's section describes how in Ecuador the resulting neo-developmentalist government relies on diverse spatial data to allocate resources and organise territory, with uneven outcomes.

Win for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Sep 29, 2017.

'Trial of the Century', the theatre production which included PhD student Ragnhild Dale as assistant director and researcher, and which was closely linked to her doctoral research, has won the Norwegian Critics Association Theatre Award 2017. The jury praised it as 'one of the most important reference works in recent political Norwegian performing arts'. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers.

Win for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 29, 2017.

'Trial of the Century', the theatre production which included PhD student Ragnhild Dale as assistant director and researcher, and which was closely linked to her doctoral research, has won the Norwegian Critics Association Theatre Award 2017. The jury praised it as 'one of the most important reference works in recent political Norwegian performing arts'. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers.

Q&A with Prof Serena Best CBE

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 19, 2017.

September's issue of IOM3 Materials world magazine features a Q & A session with Professor Serena Best CBE FREng FIMMM.

http://www.iom3.org/materials-world-magazine/feature/2017/...

SIP programme participant biographies

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Sep 18, 2017.

Monday 18th September 2017 - 10:00

 

Below you will find extended biographies for many of the participants in the Mathematics of Sea Ice Phenomena programme (August - December 2017).

 

Dr Luke Bennetts

Rolls Royce and the RR UTC shortlisted for an award at this year's THE Awards

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 07, 2017.

Rolls Royce has been shortlisted for its work with the universities of Cambridge, Birmingham and Swansea in the Most Innovative Contribution to Business-University Collaboration category at this year’s Times Higher Education Awards.  The Rolls Royce UTC has been part of the...

Postgraduate Open Day event - save the date - 3rd Nov

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 05, 2017.

The Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy will be participating in the University's Postgraduate Open Day on Friday 3 November. During the afternoon session at the Department there will be opportunities to discuss PhD projects, the MASt in Materials Science, and MPhil in Micro- and...

Women in Antarctica: the trouble with heroism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 04, 2017.

PhD student Morgan Seag writes for Chemistry World on the history of women in Antarctica, and the 'trouble with heroism' as a myth surrounding antarctic study which excluded women until the 1960s and 70s.

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 31, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

Performance of the year nomination for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 30, 2017.

The Norwegian Critics Association has announced that Trial of the Century has been nominated for its 2017 annual Critics Prize. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. PhD student Ragnhild Dale served as assistant director and researcher for the production, which was closely linked to her doctoral research. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers. Congratulations to all on this prestigious nomination!

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

SPRI Library catalogue search now online

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 12, 2017.

We are proud to announce that the Library catalogue of the Scott Polar Research Institute is now available to be searched online. This has been the culmination of many years of data improvements and technical conversion work. The collection will also be added to the main University Library catalogue in 2018.

Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jul 25, 2017.

The Council on Superconductivity has selected Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions to Applied Superconductivity Materials Technology. This IEEE Award recognizes a living individual for a career of meritorious achievements...

Gallery: INI 25th anniversary celebrations

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jul 24, 2017.

Monday 24th July 2017 - 16:45

 

On 20 July 2017 the Institute held a day of celebrations to mark the 25th anniversary of its opening in 1992. Amongst the many esteemed guests and speakers present were founding INI director Sir Michael Atiyah OM FRS FRSE FMedSci FREng, Fields Medallist Martin Hairer KBE FRS, broadcasters Dr Hannah Fry and Dr Simon Singh (pictured above), and - to mark what was also the anniversary of his original proof of Fermat's Last Theorem - Sir Andrew Wiles. The talks took place in the very same room in which Sir Andrew first presented his proof of the 17th century conjecture. 

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

Archive and Picture Library achieve Accredited status

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

We are delighted to announce that the Institute's Archive and Picture Library have been recognised under the national accreditation scheme.

Watch INI's 25th anniversary lectures live - 20 July 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jul 19, 2017.

Thursday 20th July 2017 - 10:00

 

Although our 25th anniversary celebrations - which take place on Thursday 20 July 2017 - are an invite-only event, we will be streaming many of the day's talks live.

Click here to view this live coverage, which will comprise many of the items in the below schedule.

 

Antarctic ice-shelf break-up

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 14, 2017.

A paper published this week in the Annals of Glaciology, by an international team including Alison Banwell and Ian Willis, identifies the causes of crack formation and propagation on the McMurdo Ice shelf, Antarctica, where they have recently been undertaking fieldwork. Eventually this rift will result in the calving of an iceberg from the ice shelf, through a similar process to that which enabled the large iceberg to break-off the Larsen C Ice Shelf, a few days ago. As the climate warms it is possible that such ice shelf calving events will become larger and more frequent.

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 13, 2017.

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 10, 2017.

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.

Don’s Diary

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 05, 2017.

This article first appeared in CAM - the Cambridge Alumni Magazine – Issue 81 Easter 2017. Professor Marian Holness is Professor of Petrology and a Fellow of Trinity College.

Congratulations to Dr Xavier Moya

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 30, 2017.

Dr Xavier Moya has been awarded the Emerging Talent Award 2017, which is awarded by the Spanish Society of Researcher in the United Kingdom (SRUK) and the Santander Bank Foundation.

‘Plumerang’ health risk

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 21, 2017.

Scientists have discovered that significant changes can occur in the composition of volcanic eruptive plumes whilst circulating high above the atmosphere. Nicknamed ‘plumerangs’, the evolution of such plumes represent a previously unappreciated health hazard.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 20, 2017.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron on being awarded the UK Society for Biomaterials President's Prize 2017. Ruth will be giving her prize winner's lecture at the UKSB annual conference at Loughborough University this week. The lecture is expected to be titled "Ice Templated Structures for...

Prof Serena Best receives a CBE

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 19, 2017.

Congratulations to Professor Serena Best on being awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours, for services to biomaterials engineering.

Congratulations to Dr Elliott and Dr Stone

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 15, 2017.

We are delighted that two of our academics have received promotions, to commence 1st October 2017. Dr James Elliott will become a Professor and Dr Howard Stone will become a Reader.  We hope you will join us in congratulating them.

America's eroding edges: stories from the field

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 12, 2017.

PhD student Victoria Herrmann is documenting her fieldwork exploring the effects of climate change on communities across America in a series of blog posts and articles. Victoria is currently travelling across the US and its territories, interviewing communities directly affected by shoreline erosion and climate change, and recording the impact on their ways of life.

Engaging with Science Policy

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 09, 2017.

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.

Prince Albert II of Monaco becomes Patron of SPRI

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 07, 2017.

We are pleased to announce that HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco has agreed to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute. Prince Albert, who has visited both poles and whose great- great-grandfather, Albert I, was a prominent Arctic explorer, has strong ongoing interests in the Arctic and Antarctic. Prince Albert said of his new role, "I am delighted to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute and to support their important research and heritage activities relating to the Arctic and Antarctic, especially in the context of the continuing environmental changes affecting these sensitive parts of the global climate system". Prince Albert has visited the SPRI on several previous occasions and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation has also supported the research work of the Institute.

New Cambridge research tracks changes to supraglacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on May 11, 2017.

A new paper by a team at the Scott Polar Research Institute presents a novel method for tracking changes to individual supraglacial lakes in West Greenland using MODIS satellite imagery. The method developed is a Fully Automated Supraglacial lake Tracking ("FAST") algorithm that tracks changes to individual lake areas and volumes over successive images. This builds on previous research by calculating supraglacial lake volumes as well as areas, and can be applied to large areas of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The FAST algorithm is being used in ongoing research into Greenland Ice Sheet hydrology. The team comprises PhD student Andrew Williamson, University Senior Lecturer Dr Neil Arnold, Leverhulme/Newton Trust Research Fellow Dr Alison Banwell, and University Senior Lecturer Dr Ian Willis.

Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

A team of nine people from Earth Sciences, took part in the Workplace Travel Challenge at the end of April 2017.

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

Earth Sciences' Jo Clegg wins a competition on sustainable food with the most sustainable recipe

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 27, 2017.

The Department of Earth Sciences is once again top amongst UK geology departments in the latest tables.

SPRI Review 2016

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 21, 2017.

SPRI Review 2016, is now available online. SPRI Review is the Annual Report issued by the Scott Polar Research Institute, giving information on the Institute's activities over the past year.

Water on Antarctic Ice Shelves

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Apr 20, 2017.

Alison Banwell and Ian Willis, who have recently returned from Antarctica studying the effects of meltwater on the flexure and stability of ice shelves, have been commenting about two adjacent studies that have just been published in Nature. They've been commenting in Nature, The Independent, The Atlantic, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and Climate Central.

Rotating molecules create a brighter future

By from News. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

The talk was titled ‘On the Classification of the Fossil Animals Commonly Named Dinosaurs’ and it was given in 1887 by Harry Govier Seeley, Professor of Geology at King’s College, London. Seeley argued that the ‘terrible lizards’, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time, could be simply divided into two great groups – the Saurischia and the Ornithischia based on differences in their hip structure.

When did making mountains the modern way begin?

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

What with ‘tectonic shifts’ and ‘tectonic proportions’, the processes and terminology of Earth’s major structural change or tectonism have invaded everyday language. Now geological research is adding a new dimension – ‘changing tectonic regimes’, the US presidency comes to mind. So what is a ‘change in tectonic regime’?

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 27, 2017.

A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth’s climate warms out of an ice age, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and University of Louvain have combined existing ideas to solve the problem of which solar energy peaks in the last 2.6 million years led to the melting of the ice sheets and the start of a warm period.

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The living corset-animals (loriciferans) are a remarkable group of miniscule, seabed dwelling creatures, which were first found in the 1980s. Now, the discovery by palaeontologists Tom Harvey and Nick Butterfield of the loriciferans’ deep ancestry in 490 million year old Cambrian strata is helping to rewrite the story of the Cambrian explosion of life and resolve what is known as Darwin’s dilemma.

Earth Sciences students winning prizes

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

Congratulations to our students who have recently won prizes.

Tools of the Trade

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

A display showcasing a selection of the Sedgwick Museum’s unique historic collection of geological hammers.

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The first account of the geology of Cambridgeshire was published 200 years ago. Written by the Reverend Professor John Hailstone FRS (1759-1847), the ‘Outline of the Geology of Cambridgeshire’ appeared in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society of London.

New book: Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 01, 2017.

Professor of Physical Geography and Director of the Scott Polar Instititute, Julian Dowdeswell, has co-edited a new Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms. The Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms presents a comprehensive series of contributions by leading researchers from many countries that describe, discuss and illustrate landforms on the high latitude, glacier-influenced seafloor. Included are submarine glacial landforms from modern, Quaternary and ancient glacimarine environments.

Curious Objects at the University Library

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 07, 2016.

Curious Objects – an exhibition of ‘some unusual and unexpected items’ from the University Library’s collection runs from 3 Nov 2016 - 31 March 2017 at the Milstein Exhibition Centre, Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR. Free entry.

Graduate Research Opportunities

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 02, 2016.

A full list of PhD topics for students hoping to start PhDs in 2017 with the Cambridge NERC DTP - Earth Sciences are now online.

Event: Geography and neo-vitalism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

Matthew Gandy and Michael Bravo are holding a half-day workshop on the theme of "Geography and neo-vitalism" on Wednesday 23rd November. The neo-vitalist turn in geography raises many interesting questions across the discipline including connections with the geo-humanities and new fields of interdisciplinary scholarship. In recent years the works of Henri Bergson, Hans Driesch, and other thinkers have gained influence in debates over non-human agency, post-human subjectivities, and new concepts of nature. In this workshop we wish to bring together staff and graduate students with an interest in contemporary theoretical debates for this half-day event.

Gordon Hamilton

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 25, 2016.

We are deeply saddened by the news that Dr Gordon Hamilton died while working in the field in Antarctica earlier this month. Gordon was a PhD student at SPRI in the 1990s working with Julian Dowdeswell, now our Director, on surging Svalbard glaciers. Our thoughts are with all those close to Gordon. More information is available on the University of Maine website where Gordon was a professor in the School of Earth and Climate Sciences.

SPRI Review 2015

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 05, 2016.

SPRI Review 2015, is now available online. SPRI Review is the Annual Report issued by SPRI, giving information on the Institute's activities over the past year.

International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Sep 01, 2016.

An international team of scientists is traveling to the islands of Papua New Guinea this September to study degassing from active volcanoes in remote jungles there. Some of these volcanoes are among the most active on Earth, ejecting a significant proportion of global volcanic gases into the atmosphere.

Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 02, 2016.

The ancient rugged coastline of Mistaken Point on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula face the winds and waves of the Atlantic Ocean. It can be a difficult place to work, but nevertheless it has been a mecca for geologists for over several decades now.

An underestimated Kevan

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Douglas Palmer on the Sedgwick Museum’s giant Pliosaurus cf. kevani in the latest edition of Geoscientist

Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 21, 2016.

Collections up close, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. The discovery of new fossils of an ancient seabed dwelling hemichordate called Oesia, reveals clues about their deep ancestry which is shared with humans.

Visions of the Great White South exhibition to open in London

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 22, 2016.

In August 2016 "Visions of the Great White South", an exhibition to be held at Bonhams will reunite the iconic photography of Herbert Ponting with the evocative watercolours of Edward Wilson over a century after the two men first dreamt up their plan for a joint exhibition. The British Antarctic Expedition, better known by the name of its ship the Terra Nova, took place from 1910-1913. Captain Robert Falcon Scott appointed Dr Edward Wilson, a close friend and a fine watercolourist, as his chief scientist. He also invited camera artist Herbert Ponting to join the expedition as official photographer, in a bold move in an era when high quality photography required great skill and careful attention in ordinary circumstances, let alone in the extreme environment of the Antarctic. Both Wilson and Ponting captured expedition life as well as keeping a visual record of scientific phenomena that the crew were studying. Alongside the historic artworks, visitors will have the opportunity to see contemporary interpretations of the 'great white south'. For several years the Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute, with the support of Bonhams and the Royal Navy, have run an artist in residence scheme which sends an artist to the Antarctic on board the icebreaker HMS Protector. Artists including Captain Scott's grand-daughter Daphila Scott and renowned wildlife artist Darren Rees will exhibit their responses to the frozen wilds of Antarctica.

Conference: The Historical Antarctic Sealing Industry: history, archaeology, heritage, site and artefact conservation, biodynamics and geopolitics

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 15, 2016.

This multidisciplinary conference will provide a forum for academics and heritage specialists to communicate and develop their research and expertise concerning the historical Antarctic sealing industry.

Debenham Scholarship

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 12, 2016.

The Scott Polar Research Institute is very pleased to be able to offer a Debenham Scholarship to one outstanding applicant for the M.Phil. in Polar Studies. This scholarship is worth £7,176 (2016-17 rate). The award is generously funded by a bequest from the late Barbara Debenham in memory of Frank Debenham, one of the members of Scott's 1910-1913 (Terra Nova) Expedition to the Antarctic, and founder and first Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute.