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Colour research suggests ways to 'grow' paint

By rg580 from News. Published on Feb 20, 2018.

Image of Flavobacterium IR1 colony courtesy of the University of Cambridge

"The future is open for biodegradable paints on our cars and walls – simply by growing the colour we want!" So say the chemistry researchers studying the genetics of structural colour.

Investigating the warm climate stability of the West Antarctic ice sheet

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Recent modelling studies predict that anthropogenic warming could lead to the loss of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the next few centuries, and a big rise in sea level.

Loving my research

By rg580 from News. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Images courtesy of Pembroke College

"The relevance of my research motivates me every day," says PhD student Anna Gunnarsdottir. "Finding ways to store energy more efficiently and safely is vital if we are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

AHRC Doctoral studentship: Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956-present

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded studentship at the University of Cambridge, Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) and Royal Society. The PhD studentship is one of six awards being made by the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership with the Science Museums and Archives Consortium. The project is full-time, funded for three years and begins in October 2018. It will be supervised by Dr Richard Powell (Scott Polar Research Institute and Department of Geography, University of Cambridge), Dr Catherine Souch (RGS-IBG) and Keith Moore (Royal Society), with technical training support from Charlotte Connelly (Polar Museum, Cambridge).

AHRC Doctoral studentship: Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956-present

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 19, 2018.

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded studentship at the University of Cambridge, Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) and Royal Society. The PhD studentship is one of six awards being made by the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership with the Science Museums and Archives Consortium. The project is full-time, funded for three years and begins in October 2018. It will be supervised by Dr Richard Powell (Scott Polar Research Institute and Department of Geography, University of Cambridge), Dr Catherine Souch (RGS-IBG) and Keith Moore (Royal Society), with technical training support from Charlotte Connelly (Polar Museum, Cambridge).

Dr Alex Jeffrey awarded Pilkington Prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 16, 2018.

Congratulations to Dr Alex Jeffrey, who is one the recipients of the prestigious 2017-18 Pilkington Teaching Prize, awarded for his innovative, inspiring and enthusiastic teaching.

Blue mussel shape is a powerful indicator of environmental change

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 12, 2018.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge and British Antarctic Survey have developed a new method to identify natural patterns of shell shape variation in common blue mussels.

Remembering Sir Alan Battersby

By rg580 from News. Published on Feb 12, 2018.

Image courtesy of the Department of Chemistry

We are remembering with sadness our distinguished colleague, Professor Emeritus Sir Alan Battersby, who has died shortly before what would have been his 93rd birthday. 

New video: Illuminating the hidden kingdom of the truffle

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 12, 2018.

A new video from the University of Cambridge, "Illuminating the hidden kingdom of the truffle", shows how, by using the Cambridge University Botanic Garden as a "living laboratory", Professor Ulf Büntgen and his team are discovering more about the ecology of truffles. Professor Büntgen, who is Professor of Environmental Systems Analysis in the Department of Geography, also recently appeared on the Cambridgeshire edition of BBC Countryfile discussing this research project

Professor Ulf Büntgen's truffle research on Sunday's BBC Countryfile

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 09, 2018.

Professor Ulf Büntgen will be appearing on BBC Countryfile this Sunday, discussing his research around the life-cycles of truffles. The project, which uses the Cambridge University Botanic Garden as a research site, aims to explore truffle growth, and the impact different environments, and changing environmental conditions, have on truffles. Cambridge University Botanic Garden's "Truffles in CUBG", provides further details of the project. The episode of Countryfile will be broadcast on Sunday 11th February at 6.30pm on BBC 1, and will be available for 30 days afterwards on BBC iPlayer.

Alumnus returns to give annual Lewis Lectures

By rg580 from News. Published on Feb 05, 2018.

Image courtesy of Heidelberg University

A professor of inorganic chemistry who studied for his PhD here with Professor Jack Lewis in the late 1980s is returning to the department next month to give the annual Lewis Lectures.

'Hydrogen Pistols at Dawn'

By dh473 from News. Published on Feb 05, 2018.

Image of Dr Peter Wothers courtesy Cambridge University Library

'Hydrogen Pistols at Dawn', a look at the 18th century texts that prompted a revolution in chemistry, is one of the Sandars Lectures Dr Peter Wothers will deliver in March.

Cambridge screening of Natura Urbana

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 05, 2018.

Join us for the first Cambridge screening of the documentary film 'Natura Urbana - The Brachen of Berlin' by Professor Matthew Gandy, which will take place at the Arts Picturehouse, 38-39 St Andrew's Street, at 17.45 on Monday 5th March. The screening will be followed by a Q&A moderated by Bill Adams, Moran Professor of Conservation and Development. Book your free tickets.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell awarded 2018 Lyell Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 02, 2018.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, has been awarded the 2018 Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London for significant contributions to the science through a substantial body of work. The Lyell Medal has been awarded since 1876 and is the Society's highest award for 'soft rock' geology. It was established with a gift from the distinguished 19th Century scientist Charles Lyell who wrote the 'Principles of Geology'.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell awarded 2018 Lyell Medal

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Feb 02, 2018.

Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography, has been awarded the 2018 Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London for significant contributions to the science through a substantial body of work. The Lyell Medal has been awarded since 1876 and is the Society's highest award for 'soft rock' geology. It was established with a gift from the distinguished 19th Century scientist Charles Lyell who wrote the 'Principles of Geology'.

New paper: Paradiplomacy and political geography: The geopolitics of substate regional diplomacy

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 01, 2018.

Well done to PhD student Tom Jackson, who has recently published a new paper, "Paradiplomacy and political geography: The geopolitics of substate regional diplomacy".

New paper: Drones, Diplomacy and More-than Human Geopolitics

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Feb 01, 2018.

Congratulations to first year PhD student Ed Bryan, whose book review essay "Drones, Diplomacy, and More-Than-Human Geopolitics" was published on the 31st January. The essay explores Ian Shaw's Predator Empire and Jason Dittmer's Diplomatic Material in the context of the growing interest in more-than-human and object-orientated approaches in the field of geopolitics.

Driving electric cars further

By dh473 from News. Published on Jan 30, 2018.

Courtesy Department of Chemistry Photography

Major new research into ways to extend the life of electric vehicle batteries and help electric cars go further will be led by Professor of Chemistry Clare Grey.

Pteropods tougher than thought

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 29, 2018.

Elegant little sea butterflies, more technically known as pteropods, are important members of the marine ecosystem because they are so abundant and are a food source for other marine organisms, especially whales.

Public lecture: Greenland ice cores tell tales on past sea level changes

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 29, 2018.

In this public lecture, Professor Dorthe Dahl-Jensen will present the first results from the EGRIP project's recent ice core drilling in Greenland, looking at findings about past sea-level changes. Professor Dahl-Jensen, who is visiting the Department as part of our Distinguished International Visitors Programme this February, is a world-leading expert in past climate research and Head of the Centre for Ice and Climate at the Niels Bohr Institute (University of Copenhagen). The Lecture will be held Wednesday 21st February, 5pm, in the Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography.

Geography at the 2018 Cambridge Science Festival

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 25, 2018.

The Geography Department has a range of activities and events lined up for the 2018 Cambridge Science Festival. Come along and find out about coastlines, volcanoes and the polar regions, see demonstrations with our state-of-the-art equipment, and meet our researchers. The Festival runs from 12th-25th March 2018.

New paper on the impact of glaciation on East Anglian Fenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 25, 2018.

A new paper from Professor Phil Gibbard, "Pleistocene glaciation of Fenland, England, and its implications for evolution of the region", demonstrates for the first time that the form and scale of modern Fenland, East Anglia, is due to glaciation during the late Middle Pleistocene period, around 160,000 years ago.

New paper on the impact of glaciation on East Anglian Fenland

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 25, 2018.

A new paper from Professor Phil Gibbard, "Pleistocene glaciation of Fenland, England, and its implications for evolution of the region", demonstrates for the first time that the form and scale of modern Fenland, East Anglia, is due to glaciation during the late Middle Pleistocene period, around 160,000 years ago.

Professor wins prize for Alzheimer's-related research

By dh473 from News. Published on Jan 22, 2018.

Image courtesy Tuomas Knowles

Tuomas Knowles, Professor of Physical Chemistry and Biophysics, has been awarded the 2017 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Biophysics.

RAS Gold Medal for Professor Robert White

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 22, 2018.

Congratulations to Robert (Bob) White, Professor of Geophysics and Fellow of St Edmund’s College, who has been awarded the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal for a lifetime of distinguished achievement in solid Earth geophysics.

Studying Arctic Fields

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 21, 2018.

The Launch for Richard Powell's new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Culturers, Practices, and Environmental Sciences will be held at SPRI at 4.30 p.m., Monday 26 February 2018. This event is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen's University Press. Please RSVP [jenny.dunstall@spri.cam.ac.uk] to attend.

Studying Arctic Fields

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jan 21, 2018.

The Launch for Richard Powell's new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Culturers, Practices, and Environmental Sciences will be held at SPRI at 4.30 p.m., Monday 26 February 2018. This event is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen's University Press. Please RSVP [jenny.dunstall@spri.cam.ac.uk] to attend.

'Architecture, geo-politics and scientific knowledge' workshop

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 19, 2018.

This workshop, Architecture, geo-politics and scientific knowledge, to be held on Wednesday 24th January 2018 at King's College, Cambridge, investigates variegated relationships between architecture, broadly conceived, and the sciences of behavior and life, such as psychology, biology and ecology. Underlining the historical, geographical and geo-political aspects to these relationships, the workshop is interested in the genealogy, translation and operationalization of such fundamental concepts as need, organization, or environment, among others. How can we relate such epistemological histories and geographies of architecture to the widely divergent forms of politics enacted by architects, urban designers and spatial practitioners? Speakers include: Peg Rawes (The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL) Léa-Catherine Szacka (Manchester School of Architecture, University of Manchester) Yimin Zhao (Department of Geography and Environment, LSE) Sandra Jasper (Department of Geography, University of Cambridge) Maros Krivy (Department of Geography, University of Cambridge)

The beginnings of communal life – 565 million years ago

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jan 18, 2018.

Ancient rock strata exposed within the World Heritage Site of Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland, record one of Life's very first communities of seabed dwelling macro-organisms. Known as the Ediacaran biota, it is around 565 million years old.

Total Energy and Force Methods 2018

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jan 16, 2018.

The latest workshop in the “mini” series associated to the “Total Energies and Forces” conference, organised by ICTP in Trieste every two years, was held in Cambridge from 9th to 11th January 2018.

The workshop focused on the most recent developments in the field of...

Using GAIA to detect low frequency gravitational waves

By from News. Published on Jan 11, 2018.

Pani, Pahar: Waters of the Himalayas

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 11, 2018.

A photo essay on the Pani, Pahar research project, "Sacred, life affirming and fast disappearing: waters of the Himalayas" is now available from the Guardian. The project explores the escalating water crisis in the Himalayas. It is a collaborative project from Professor Bhaskar Vira and Dr Eszter Kovacs (Geography Department), photojournalist Toby Smith, the University Library, and the Centre for South Asian Studies.

Geography undergraduates at Caius publish academic paper

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 11, 2018.

Third year Geography students at Caius have gained an early taste of academic publication, co-authoring a paper in a prestigious journal alongside an international team of scientists co-led by their former Director of Studies, Dr David Rose (now at UEA), with Juliette Young (CEH) and Nibedita Mukherjee (Exeter).

Bubbles, batteries and bangs: Chemistry Open Day 2018

By rg580 from News. Published on Jan 08, 2018.

There will be bubbles, batteries and bangs at our Open Day in mid-March. Budding chemists can enjoy creating rainbows in test tubes, making batteries from fruits and exploring non-Newtonian liquids like cornflour slime!

Public Lecture: Racial Banishment: old and new forms of urban transformation in the United States

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 08, 2018.

Professor Ananya Roy (UCLA Luskin) will detail key elements of racial banishment and indicate how urban transformation is articulated with necropolitics, including mass incarceration. Thinking from Los Angeles, she will argue that what is at stake is not only a more robust analysis of urban transformations but also attention to the various forms of urban politics that are challenging racial capitalism. Professor Ananya Roy is visiting the Department as part of our Distinguished International Visitors Programme this January. The lecture will be held on Thursday 18th January 2018, 5pm, in the Large Lecture Theatre, Main Geography Building, Downing Site.

Book release: North Sea Surge, 2nd Edition: social accounts of the 1953 floods remain relevant over 60 years later

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 04, 2018.

In 1953, England suffered its deadliest natural disaster in over 350 years. The cause - a North Sea Surge that swept its way down the east coast battering communities from Northumberland to Norfolk and beyond to the Thames Estuary. Over 300 people were killed in England alone, both during the storm and in the chaotic aftermath that followed. As one of the few sociological accounts of the impacts on flood victims, North Sea Surge has often been cited by research scientists, in government reports and the press. Now in a second edition, James Pollard updates the unforgettable story of the East Coast Floods, in North Sea Surge: The story of the East Coast Floods of 1953, 2nd Edition.

Cambridge University selects coastal Geography case study to showcase Public Engagement with Research

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Jan 04, 2018.

"The potential effects of climate change and of human modifications of the landscape on flood risk are critically important if human society is to continue to thrive in flood-prone areas" says Dr Möller of the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit and the Biogeography and Biogeomorphology Research Group at the Department of Geography. "To encourage greater awareness of this important issue, we successfully applied to the University's Public Engagement with Research Awards scheme in 2016 to construct our augmented reality dynamic landscape sand box". The sand box has multiple uses. It is as useful as a tool to engage research stakeholders and policy makers in discussion around complex flood protection and climate adaptation issues as it is for engaging the general public during events such as the University's Science Festival, where it will next make an appearance on the 17th of March 2018.

Prof Bernard Silverman FRS: longtime INI supporter knighted in New Year's Honours

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Jan 02, 2018.

Tuesday 2nd January 2018 - 16:15

 

The Institute would like to extend its warmest congratulations to Professor Bernard Silverman - a long-time friend and supporter of INI - who has been knighted in the New Year's Honours list 2018.

Dissertation diaspora

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 21, 2017.

See where some of our students went on fieldwork in the summer for their dissertations, in this year's 'Dissertation diaspora'.

Going underground: Cambridge digs into the history of geology with landmark exhibition

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

A box full of diamonds, volcanic rock from Mount Vesuvius, and the geology guide that Darwin packed for his epic voyage on the Beagle are on display at the Cambridge University Library as part of the first major exhibition to celebrate geological map-making.

Postgraduate Engagement Fellowship - apply now

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

Postgraduate students have until 15th January 2018 to apply to be an Engagement Fellow at the Polar Museum at SPRI. This is a paid opportunity thanks to the generous support of the British Society for the History of Science. Applicants do not need specialist polar or climate knowledge - we are looking for somebody who is enthusiastic about communicating historical ideas about our changing climate. Full training and support will be given. Further details are available on the British Society for the History of Science website.

Natura Urbana wins at the Yosemite Film Festival

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

Natura Urbana - The Brachen of Berlin picked up the Best Documentary Feature prize at the Yosemite Film Festival 2017. The ERC funded documentary film by Professor Matthew Gandy and Dr Sandra Jasper tells the post-war history of Berlin through its plants. Many congratulations to the Rethinking Urban Nature team.

Rescued radar maps reveal Antarctica's past

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

An international team of researchers has scanned and digitised two million records held at the Scott Polar Research Institute from pioneering aeroplane radar expeditions that criss-crossed the frozen continent in the 1960s and 1970s. The digitized data extend the record of changes at the bottom of the ice sheet, such as the formation of channels as Antarctica's ice flows, by more than two decades. The work could also help researchers get a better handle on how the ice sheet might respond as global temperatures rise. Read more in Nature and on Stanford University's website.

Postgraduate Engagement Fellowship - apply now

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 20, 2017.

Postgraduate students have until 15th January 2018 to apply to be an Engagement Fellow at the Polar Museum at SPRI. This is a paid opportunity thanks to the generous support of the British Society for the History of Science. Applicants do not need specialist polar or climate knowledge - we are looking for somebody who is enthusiastic about communicating historical ideas about our changing climate. Full training and support will be given. Further details are available on the British Society for the History of Science website.

Dr Xavier Moya attends SRUK Emerging Talent Award presentation

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Dec 19, 2017.

Dr Xavier Moya (above, centre) was presented with his SRUK Emerging Talent Award 2017 in a ceremony at the Spanish Embassy.   The presentation was made by Carlos Bastarrache Sagües, the Spanish Ambassador to the UK, Antonio Escámez, President of the Banco Santander Foundation (above, right),...

Annual Report for 2016-17

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 19, 2017.

The Department's Annual Report for 2016-17, containing an overview of departmental activities across research, teaching, and technical and information services, is now available online.

Invited expert review for the IPCC

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 16, 2017.

Professor Tom Spencer has been invited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to act as an Expert Reviewer of pre-release, internal draft material on 'extremes, abrupt changes and managing risks' as part of the IPCC's Special Report on the Ocean and the Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).

Invited expert review for the IPCC

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 16, 2017.

Professor Tom Spencer has been invited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to act as an Expert Reviewer of pre-release, internal draft material on 'extremes, abrupt changes and managing risks' as part of the IPCC's Special Report on the Ocean and the Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).

The ethics of pet keeping

From Geography at Cambridge - news - Geography. Published on Dec 14, 2017.

Dr Philip Howell spoke recently about the ethics of pet keeping on the BBC Radio 3 programme Free Thinking, drawing on his work on the cultural and historical geography of dogs in Victorian Britain. Dr Howell appears in a panel discussion along with the animal behaviourist John Bradshaw, the bioethicist Jessica Pierce, and the novelist Laura Purcell.

Interview: "Form in Art" contributing artist Manoel Veiga

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Dec 07, 2017.

Thursday 7th December 2017 - 15:00

 

Since 20 November 2017, INI has played host to the art exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form". Run concurrently with the "Growth form and self-organisation" programme, it has aimed to "explore the relationship between form, as understood mathematically, and art" and features works from 10 leading contemporary artists.

At the exhibition's launch event, and shortly before he returned to his native Sao Paulo, we interviewed one of the contributing artists: Manoel Veiga.

 

The Geological Anthropocene born in Burlington House

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 06, 2017.

Discussions concerning the recognition and potential definition of a new division of geological time during which humans have become overarchingly influencing natural systems have led to the proposal to define a new time interval, the Anthropocene (see earlier reports on these pages). The controversy generated in the geological world has been offset by the remarkable interest the concept has initiated in non-geological, and especially in non-scientific fields. The discussions, initiated during meetings of the Geological Society's Stratigraphy Commission, of which Professor Phil Gibbard, Dr Colin Summerhayes, and the other authors are members, has led to worldwide debate. These discussions have also spawned new lines of research, and encouraged inter-disciplinary discussions by members of the department, involving reseachers and students alike. A new report presents the state of these fast evolving discussions developments that have animated the normally tranquil world of stratigraphy.

Recruiting now: Polar Museum - Collections Coordinator

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Dec 01, 2017.

The Polar Museum is looking for an organised and enthusiastic museum professional to manage its collection of polar artefacts and artworks. The Collections Coordinator is responsible for a range of tasks including facilitating collections research, answering external enquiries, undertaking and improving documentation of the Museum's collections, negotiating and administering loans and ensuring that the collections are appropriately stored and displayed. In addition they support the wider activity of the museum as needed. This is an exciting time to join the Scott Polar Research Institute as we approach our centenary year in 2020. With over 50,000 visitors a year and activities that include exhibitions, events and teaching, work in the Polar Museum team is always varied. Find out more on our vacancies page.

Video interviews: INI programme Organisers

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 24, 2017.

Friday 24th November 2017 - 12:00

 

Since August 2017, INI has filmed video interviews with the Organisers of each programme held at the Institute. The aim of these videos is to provide an introduction to the subject of each programme, the challenges inherent within it, and the likely outcomes from the research undertaken. Below you will find those that have been published so far, starting with the most recent and descending in chronological order. This page will be refreshed with new videos as they are produced. 

Enhancing the growth of plants on inhospitable land using a biological fertiliser

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

A simple mixture of organic waste, such as chicken manure and zeolite, a porous volcanic mineral, has been developed into a powerful bio-fertiliser which can also reclaim semi-arid and contaminated land.

Inverse Problems Network meeting, 23-24 November 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 20, 2017.

Monday 20th November 2017 - 14:45

 

INI is pleased to welcome the EPSRC-funded Inverse Problems Network, which will hold a two day meeting at the Institute on 23-24 November. 

The meeting will commence with a 12.00 lunch held in the common room of the maths campus' nearby Pavilion F. The talks, meanwhile, will be held in INI's Seminar Room 1. 

There is no need to register, and full details of the event can be found via the following link: http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/invprob2/showtt.php

 

 

 

 

Rising Tides bring innovation prize

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 17, 2017.

Victoria Herrmann, a PhD student at the Scott Polar Research Institute and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, has won a prestigious US social entrepreneurship prize for a research project on US towns and cities at risk of partial submersion due to climate change. Victoria's was one of 10 projects to scoop the JM Kaplan Fund Innovation Prize. Her winning Rising Tides project will create a new online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities.

Jim Charles, 1926 – 2017

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Nov 16, 2017.

We are deeply saddened to announce that Dr Jim Charles, Emeritus Reader in Metallurgy, died peacefully in Cambridge on 13 November 2017, aged 91.

Jim is remembered fondly in his obituary published online by St. John's College ...

Living without the Dead: Loss and Redemption in a Jungle Cosmos

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 16, 2017.

Living without the Dead: Loss and Redemption in a Jungle Cosmos is a new book by Piers Vitebsky. Just one generation ago, the Sora tribe in India lived in a world populated by the spirits of their dead, who spoke to them through shamans in trance. Every day, they negotiated their wellbeing in heated arguments or in quiet reflections on their feelings of love, anger, and guilt. Today, young Sora are rejecting the worldview of their ancestors and switching their allegiance to warring sects of fundamentalist Christianity or Hinduism. Communion with ancestors is banned, sacred sites demolished, and female shamans replaced by male priests, as debate with the dead gives way to prayer to gods. For some, this shift means liberation from jungle spirits through literacy, employment, and democratic politics; others despair of being forgotten after death. How can a society abandon one understanding of reality so suddenly and see the world in a totally different way? Over forty years, anthropologist Piers Vitebsky has shared the lives of shamans, pastors, ancestors, gods, policemen, missionaries, and alphabet worshippers, seeking explanations from social theory, psychoanalysis, and theology. Living without the Dead lays bare today's crisis of indigenous religions as historical reform brings new fulfillments—but also new torments and uncertainties. From the award-winning author of The Reindeer People, this is a heartbreaking story of the extinction of an irreplaceable world, even while new religious forms come into being.

"More Tales of our Forefathers" - a talk by Professor Barry Simon, 13 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 16:15


"More Tales of our Forefathers"
Professor Barry Simon 
13 December 2017

14:00-16:30

 

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium - 12 December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 14, 2017.

Tuesday 14th November 2017 - 12:45

Konrad Bajer Commemorative Symposium

New paper on inland advance of supraglacial lakes in Greenland under climatic warming

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 13, 2017.

A new article by recently graduated undergraduate student Laura Gledhill (Downing College) and Scott Polar Research Institute PhD student Andrew Williamson explores the inland advance of supraglacial lakes in a north-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet under recent climatic warming. The paper, published recently in the Annals of Glaciology, is based on Laura's undergraduate dissertation, which Andrew supervised. Many congratulations to them both!

"Form in Art: Art of Form" - an INI exhibition, November-December 2017

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Nov 09, 2017.

Thursday 9th November 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to announce that this autumn we will be hosting the public exhibition "Form in Art: Art of Form".

APEX-II Program has won the first "Newton Prize"

By from News. Published on Nov 03, 2017.

Physical Geography / Environmental Science PhD opportunities

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Nov 01, 2017.

The list of PhD topics we would like to pursue with interested students has just been launched. The link gives further details. CCRU also has a list of topics. The funding deadline is 4th January 2018, for an October 2018 start. Do get in touch with a prospective supervisor who will help with your application as soon as possible.

‘Monster’ planet discovery challenges formation theory

By from News. Published on Oct 31, 2017.

Department of Geography Postgraduate open day 3rd November

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 27, 2017.

Students and staff will be available to talk about life as a Graduate in the Department of Geography and ongoing Human and Physical Geography study and research. Venue: The Library - Department of Geography, Downing Place, CB2 3EN, 2-4pm The Scott Polar Research Institute will be open for visits. MPhil and PhD students will be available to talk about life in the department and SPRI Course Director will be available to chat to potential students. Venue: Main Reception, Scott Polar Research Institute, Lensfield Road, CB2 1ER 2-4pm There will also be a Geography Admissions Talk at 3pm, 3 November, Seminar Room, Department of Geography, CB2 3EN. Speakers will be Dr Emma Mawdsley "Moving on to an MPhil and PhD" and Professor Christine Lane – "Talking and answering questions on Physical Geography Research at Cambridge."

Collaborating on carbon capture and storage

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

Cambridge Earth Sciences is part of a global project researching new sites for carbon capture and storage (CCS), supported by leading multinational minerals and energy company BHP.

New paper in Nature - Seafloor ploughmarks left by icebergs record rapid West Antarctic ice retreat

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 25, 2017.

In a new study published in Nature, Matt Wise and Julian Dowdeswell from Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, together with scientists from the British Antarctic Survey and Stockholm University investigate imagery of the seafloor of Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica. Identifying thousands of ploughmarks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, they show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as its margins balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable. Today, as the global climate continues to warm, rapid and sustained retreat may be close to happening again, and could trigger runaway ice retreat into the interior of the continent, which in turn would cause sea levels to rise even faster than currently projected.

New exhibit explores recent Greenland fieldwork

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Oct 23, 2017.

The Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Institute is currently hosting a temporary exhibition 'Uummannaq: 100 years of exploration in Greenland' featuring fieldwork undertaken by Geography researchers over the summer. Led by Dr Poul Christoffersen the exhibition includes research undertaken by PhD students Samuel Cook and Tom Chudley. Samuel used a terrestrial radar interferometer to produce a unique record of iceberg calving from which he can calibrate a numerical model. While Tom used an Unmanned Aircraft System ('drone') to produce imagery of the calving ice front and the glacier in ultra high spatial resolution.

Printable poster of INI Programmes & Workshops 2018

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

Thursday 19th October 2017 - 12:30

 

Throughout 2018 the Isaac Newton Institute will be hosting a total of four programmes and 17 workshops.

For ease of reference, we have produced the below poster showing the year's schedule along with basic details of the key events.

If you would like to download, share or print the poster, please click here to access the PDF.

Materials Science Postgraduate Open Day - 3rd November

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Oct 19, 2017.

Interested in postgraduate study?  Come to the Department on Friday 3 November to hear about our research opportunities and taught courses, meet the academic staff, and have a guided tour with current students. All prospective students welcome.  Regular bus service from the centre of town to the...

Printable poster of UNQ programme schedule

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Wednesday 18th October 2017 - 14:45

 

The Isaac Newton Institute is proud to be hosting the UNQ programme from January to June 2018. This collaboration of uncertainty quantification researchers comprises four main workshops, for which applications are currently open.

If you would like to download, print or share a poster of the programme's schedule (pictured below) then please click here to access the PDF.

Award winning researchers in Earth Sciences

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 18, 2017.

Congratulations to our researchers who have recently won awards.

Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

Dr Elizabeth Harper has been appointed Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum following the retirement of Dr Ken McNamara.

100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

To mark 100 years since John E Marr became Woodwardian Professor, on 30 October 1917, a selection of documents have been digitised and will be available to view on the Sedgwick Museum website from 30 October.

Cavendish III : A new era for physics at Cambridge

By from News. Published on Oct 17, 2017.

Plate Tectonics at 50

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Oct 06, 2017.

The Geological Society of London has launched its new archive of Emeritus Professor Dan McKenzie’s work.

Tributes to Fields Medallist Vladimir Voevodsky (1966-2017)

By dja52 from Isaac Newton Institute News. Published on Oct 04, 2017.

Wednesday 4th October 2017 - 11:45

(photo: Andrea Kane)

The Isaac Newton Institute was this week deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Fields Medallist Vladimir Voevodsky at the age of 51.

Win for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 29, 2017.

'Trial of the Century', the theatre production which included PhD student Ragnhild Dale as assistant director and researcher, and which was closely linked to her doctoral research, has won the Norwegian Critics Association Theatre Award 2017. The jury praised it as 'one of the most important reference works in recent political Norwegian performing arts'. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers.

Q&A with Prof Serena Best CBE

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 19, 2017.

September's issue of IOM3 Materials world magazine features a Q & A session with Professor Serena Best CBE FREng FIMMM.

http://www.iom3.org/materials-world-magazine/feature/2017/...

Rolls Royce and the RR UTC shortlisted for an award at this year's THE Awards

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 07, 2017.

Rolls Royce has been shortlisted for its work with the universities of Cambridge, Birmingham and Swansea in the Most Innovative Contribution to Business-University Collaboration category at this year’s Times Higher Education Awards.  The Rolls Royce UTC has been part of the...

Postgraduate Open Day event - save the date - 3rd Nov

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Sep 05, 2017.

The Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy will be participating in the University's Postgraduate Open Day on Friday 3 November. During the afternoon session at the Department there will be opportunities to discuss PhD projects, the MASt in Materials Science, and MPhil in Micro- and...

Women in Antarctica: the trouble with heroism

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Sep 04, 2017.

PhD student Morgan Seag writes for Chemistry World on the history of women in Antarctica, and the 'trouble with heroism' as a myth surrounding antarctic study which excluded women until the 1960s and 70s.

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 31, 2017.

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

Performance of the year nomination for Trial of the Century

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 30, 2017.

The Norwegian Critics Association has announced that Trial of the Century has been nominated for its 2017 annual Critics Prize. The production, which took place in February, staged the upcoming court case over the 23rd licensing round for petroleum in the Norwegian Barents Sea. PhD student Ragnhild Dale served as assistant director and researcher for the production, which was closely linked to her doctoral research. Ragnhild worked with director Morten Traavik of traavik.info and Pikene på Broen as co-producers. Congratulations to all on this prestigious nomination!

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Aug 14, 2017.

We were very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

SPRI Library catalogue search now online

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Aug 12, 2017.

We are proud to announce that the Library catalogue of the Scott Polar Research Institute is now available to be searched online. This has been the culmination of many years of data improvements and technical conversion work. The collection will also be added to the main University Library catalogue in 2018.

Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jul 25, 2017.

The Council on Superconductivity has selected Professor Judith Driscoll to receive the IEEE Dr. James Wong Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions to Applied Superconductivity Materials Technology. This IEEE Award recognizes a living individual for a career of meritorious achievements...

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

Archive and Picture Library achieve Accredited status

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 20, 2017.

We are delighted to announce that the Institute's Archive and Picture Library have been recognised under the national accreditation scheme.

Antarctic ice-shelf break-up

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jul 14, 2017.

A paper published this week in the Annals of Glaciology, by an international team including Alison Banwell and Ian Willis, identifies the causes of crack formation and propagation on the McMurdo Ice shelf, Antarctica, where they have recently been undertaking fieldwork. Eventually this rift will result in the calving of an iceberg from the ice shelf, through a similar process to that which enabled the large iceberg to break-off the Larsen C Ice Shelf, a few days ago. As the climate warms it is possible that such ice shelf calving events will become larger and more frequent.

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 13, 2017.

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 10, 2017.

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.

Don’s Diary

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jul 05, 2017.

This article first appeared in CAM - the Cambridge Alumni Magazine – Issue 81 Easter 2017. Professor Marian Holness is Professor of Petrology and a Fellow of Trinity College.

Congratulations to Dr Xavier Moya

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 30, 2017.

Dr Xavier Moya has been awarded the Emerging Talent Award 2017, which is awarded by the Spanish Society of Researchers in the United Kingdom (SRUK) and the Santander Bank Foundation.

‘Plumerang’ health risk

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 21, 2017.

Scientists have discovered that significant changes can occur in the composition of volcanic eruptive plumes whilst circulating high above the atmosphere. Nicknamed ‘plumerangs’, the evolution of such plumes represent a previously unappreciated health hazard.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron

By Lianne Sallows from News. Published on Jun 20, 2017.

Congratulations to Prof Ruth Cameron on being awarded the UK Society for Biomaterials President's Prize 2017. Ruth will be giving her prize winner's lecture at the UKSB annual conference at Loughborough University this week. The lecture is expected to be titled "Ice Templated Structures for...

America's eroding edges: stories from the field

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 12, 2017.

PhD student Victoria Herrmann is documenting her fieldwork exploring the effects of climate change on communities across America in a series of blog posts and articles. Victoria is currently travelling across the US and its territories, interviewing communities directly affected by shoreline erosion and climate change, and recording the impact on their ways of life.

Engaging with Science Policy

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Jun 09, 2017.

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.

Prince Albert II of Monaco becomes Patron of SPRI

From Geography at Cambridge - news - SPRI. Published on Jun 07, 2017.

We are pleased to announce that HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco has agreed to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute. Prince Albert, who has visited both poles and whose great- great-grandfather, Albert I, was a prominent Arctic explorer, has strong ongoing interests in the Arctic and Antarctic. Prince Albert said of his new role, "I am delighted to become Patron of the Scott Polar Research Institute and to support their important research and heritage activities relating to the Arctic and Antarctic, especially in the context of the continuing environmental changes affecting these sensitive parts of the global climate system". Prince Albert has visited the SPRI on several previous occasions and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation has also supported the research work of the Institute.

Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

A team of nine people from Earth Sciences, took part in the Workplace Travel Challenge at the end of April 2017.

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on May 04, 2017.

Earth Sciences' Jo Clegg wins a competition on sustainable food with the most sustainable recipe

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Apr 27, 2017.

The Department of Earth Sciences is once again top amongst UK geology departments in the latest tables.

The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 23, 2017.

The talk was titled ‘On the Classification of the Fossil Animals Commonly Named Dinosaurs’ and it was given in 1887 by Harry Govier Seeley, Professor of Geology at King’s College, London. Seeley argued that the ‘terrible lizards’, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time, could be simply divided into two great groups – the Saurischia and the Ornithischia based on differences in their hip structure.

When did making mountains the modern way begin?

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Mar 14, 2017.

What with ‘tectonic shifts’ and ‘tectonic proportions’, the processes and terminology of Earth’s major structural change or tectonism have invaded everyday language. Now geological research is adding a new dimension – ‘changing tectonic regimes’, the US presidency comes to mind. So what is a ‘change in tectonic regime’?

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 27, 2017.

A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth’s climate warms out of an ice age, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and University of Louvain have combined existing ideas to solve the problem of which solar energy peaks in the last 2.6 million years led to the melting of the ice sheets and the start of a warm period.

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The living corset-animals (loriciferans) are a remarkable group of miniscule, seabed dwelling creatures, which were first found in the 1980s. Now, the discovery by palaeontologists Tom Harvey and Nick Butterfield of the loriciferans’ deep ancestry in 490 million year old Cambrian strata is helping to rewrite the story of the Cambrian explosion of life and resolve what is known as Darwin’s dilemma.

Earth Sciences students winning prizes

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

Congratulations to our students who have recently won prizes.

Tools of the Trade

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

A display showcasing a selection of the Sedgwick Museum’s unique historic collection of geological hammers.

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

From Department of Earth Sciences. Published on Feb 13, 2017.

The first account of the geology of Cambridgeshire was published 200 years ago. Written by the Reverend Professor John Hailstone FRS (1759-1847), the ‘Outline of the Geology of Cambridgeshire’ appeared in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society of London.